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Hope College June 2011 : Page 2

News FrOm HOpe COllege Volume 42, No. 5 June 2011 On the Cover Flags from around the world fly outside the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication (several others, including the U.S. flag, are on the other side of the building). Hope’s commitment to preparing students for life in an interconnected world traces back to the 1866 inauguration of the Rev. Philip Phelps Jr., when featured speaker the Rev. Isaac Wyckoff encouraged Hope’s first president to make study abroad and learning other languages an institutional priority. It continues campus-wide today. Volume 42, No. 5 June 2011 Published for Alumni, Friends and Parents of Hope College by the Office of Public and Community Relations. Should you receive more than one copy, please pass it on to someone in your community. An overlap of Hope College constituencies makes duplication sometimes unavoidable. Editor Gregory S. Olgers ’87 “Quote, unquote” uote, unquote is an eclectic sampling of things said at and about Hope College . Hope celebrated the first national Undergraduate Research Week in April with multiple activities, an emphasis only appropriate considering that the college has involved students in original collaborative research and creative work for decades. Hope even played a national role in the week, presenting at the invitation of the Council of Undergraduate Research a webinar on “Transformational Learning through Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance” for which colleges and universities around the country registered. Hope opened its commemoration with a keynote address by Dr. Nancy Hensel, executive officer of CUR, who presented “Making Explicit the Implicit: Defining Undergraduate Research.” The following excerpts from Dr. Hensel’s April 11 talk focus on why undergraduate research matters. “A few years ago, the American Association for the Advancement of Science celebrated the 125th anniversary of the journal Science . And as part of their celebration, they identified gaps in our basic scientific knowledge with a lot of different questions, questions such as: ‘Are we alone in the universe?,’ ‘What determines species diversity?,’ ‘What genetic changes made us uniquely human?,’ or, ‘How did cooperative behavior evolve?’ And the question that I would really like answered is, ‘How are memories stored and retrieved?’ Some of you are young and don’t have to worry about that so much, but when you reach my age… “So, who’s going to discover the answers to these questions? It may be the students who are working with you in your undergraduate research program. If the answers to any of these questions Q are discovered in the United States, someone who has had an undergraduate research experience at one of our colleges and universities will be most likely to discover it. “And while the answers to some questions may never be found, posing the question and seeking answers is still a worthwhile endeavor. The National Endowment for the Humanities, for example, has a program on enduring questions such as: ‘What is the good life?,’ ‘Is there such a thing as a just war?,’ ‘What is friendship?,’ ‘Are there universals in human nature?’ “Examining these questions can lead to a better understanding of such complex issues whether or not we ever find a definitive answer. “This is one of the reasons why I and CUR are passionate believers in the importance of undergraduate research across all disciplines. We are convinced that involving students in research, when students are working with real questions and confronting real problems, is the best preparation for any profession. “Clearly, we want scientists to be creative, innovative thinkers who can wrestle with the big unanswered questions. But I think we also want our teachers, our lawyers, our social workers, our business leaders and our elected officials to also be thinking about the important questions of our society and to seek the answers through a process of inquiry, analysis, and discovery… “Students learn from many different research methodologies and from basic as well as applied research and they are doing this research all over the world. A lot of people will argue that basic research is more rigorous and more important than other kinds of research. I would like to suggest, however, that our students will go into many professions. Not all will become professors or researchers but all will engage in some kind of work. Their work will be significantly enhanced and enriched by their research experiences, and our communities, our nation and the world will benefit when these engaged citizens apply their research skills and their knowledge to the important questions in their professional and community lives.” Layout and Design Wesley A. Wooley ’89 Printing Walsworth Print Group of St. Joseph, Mich. Contributing Writers Greg Chandler, Chris Lewis ’09 Contributing Photographers Erik Alberg ’90, Rob Kurtycz, Lynne Powe ‘86, Lou Schakel ’71 Hope College Office of Public Relations DeWitt Center, Holland, MI 49423-3698 phone: (616) 395-7860 fax: (616) 395-7991 prelations@hope.edu Thomas L. Renner ’67 Associate Vice President for Public and Community Relations Gregory S. Olgers ’87 Director of News Media Services Lynne M. Powe ’86 Associate Director of Public and Community Relations Julie Rawlings ’83 Huisingh Public Relations Services Administrator Karen Bos Office Manager News from Hope College is published during April, June, August, October, and December by Hope College, 141 East 12th Street, Holland, Michigan 49423-3698 Postmaster: Send address changes to news from Hope College, Holland, MI 49423-3698 Notice of Nondiscrimination Hope College is committed to the concept of equal rights, equal opportunities and equal protection under the law. Hope College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, creed or disability to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at Hope College, including the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, and athletic and other school-administered programs. With regard to employment, the College complies with all legal requirements prohibiting discrimination in employment. 2 News From Hope College

"Quote, Unquote"

Quote, unquote is an eclectic sampling of things said at and about Hope College.<br /> <br /> Hope celebrated the first national Undergraduate Research Week in April with multiple activities, an emphasis only appropriate considering that the college has involved students in original collaborative research and creative work for decades. Hope even played a national role in the week, presenting at the invitation of the Council of Undergraduate Research a webinar on “Transformational Learning through Undergraduate Research and Creative Performance” for which colleges and universities around the country registered. Hope opened its commemoration with a keynote address by Dr. Nancy Hensel, executive officer of CUR, who presented “Making Explicit the Implicit: Defining Undergraduate Research.” The following excerpts from Dr. Hensel’s April 11 talk focus on why undergraduate research matters.<br /> <br /> “A few years ago, the American Association for the Advancement of Science celebrated the 125th anniversary of the journal Science. And as part of their celebration, they identified gaps in our basic scientific knowledge with a lot of different questions, questions such as: ‘Are we alone in the universe?,’ ‘What determines species diversity?,’ ‘What genetic changes made us uniquely human?,’ or, ‘How did cooperative behavior evolve?’ And the question that I would really like answered is, ‘How are memories stored and retrieved?’ Some of you are young and don’t have to worry about that so much, but when you reach my age…<br /> <br /> “So, who’s going to discover the answers to these questions? It may be the students who are working with you in your undergraduate research program. If the answers to any of these questions are discovered in the United States, someone who has had an undergraduate research experience at one of our colleges and universities will be most likely to discover it.<br /> <br /> “And while the answers to some questions may never be found, posing the question and seeking answers is still a worthwhile endeavor. The National Endowment for the Humanities, for example, has a program on enduring questions such as: ‘What is the good life?,’ ‘Is there such a thing as a just war?,’ ‘What is friendship?,’ ‘Are there universals in human nature?’ <br /> <br /> “Examining these questions can lead to a better understanding of such complex issues whether or not we ever find a definitive answer.<br /> <br /> “This is one of the reasons why I and CUR are passionate believers in the importance of undergraduate research across all disciplines. We are convinced that involving students in research, when students are working with real questions and confronting real problems, is the best preparation for any profession.<br /> <br /> “Clearly, we want scientists to be creative, innovative thinkers who can wrestle with the big unanswered questions. But I think we also want our teachers, our lawyers, our social workers, our business leaders and our elected officials to also be thinking about the important questions of our society and to seek the answers through a process of inquiry, analysis, and discovery…<br /> <br /> “Students learn from many different research methodologies and from basic as well as applied research and they are doing this research all over the world. A lot of people will argue that basic research is more rigorous and more important than other kinds of research. I would like to suggest, however, that our students will go into many professions. Not all will become professors or researchers but all will engage in some kind of work. Their work will be significantly enhanced and enriched by their research experiences, and our communities, our nation and the world will benefit when these engaged citizens apply their research skills and their knowledge to the important questions in their professional and community lives.”

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