Dermatology World May 2011 : Page-44

celebrating members Drs. Guttman, Choate win Young Investigators Award wo promising young dermatologic researchers were named the winners of the Academy’s 2011 Young Inves-tigators in Dermatology Award at the 69th Annual Meeting. Yale University der-matologist Keith A. Choate, M.D., Ph.D., and Weill Cornell Medical College dermatology resident Emma Guttman, M.D., were selected based on their research and commitment to contributing to the specialty literature. Dr. Guttman’s research focuses on Th17 responses in atopic dermatitis. Her work demonstrated decreased expres-sion of IL-17 and IL-23 in chronic atopic dermatitis skin lesions when compared to psoriasis. She also identified dif-ferences in terminal differentiation between atopic dermati-tis and psoriasis. Dr. Choate’s research focuses on the genetic basis of the disorder ichthyosis with confetti. His work on the topic has led to publication in Science and a National Institutes of Health Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Develop-ment Award, or K08 award. Physicians in accredited dermatology residency programs or those who have completed their residencies within the last two years are eligible for the awards. For more information visit www.aad.org/education-and-quality-care/awards-grants-and-scholarships/young-investigators-award. –John carruthers Members Making A Difference: Kenneth Kraemer, M.d. NIH DerMATOlOgIsT sTuDIes XP, Offers PATIeNTs suPPOrT T derMatologist Kenneth KraeMer, M.d., who works in the DNA Repair Section of the Na-tional Cancer Institute, has made a substantial career out of studying the rare genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The autosomal recessive disorder leaves patients without the ability to repair the damage cause by ultraviolet light. Dr. Krae-mer has studied XP patients at the National Institutes of Health since 1971, evaluating more than 100 patients and their family members free of charge. In addition to scientific breakthroughs — notably the use of oral retinoids to prevent skin cancer in XP patients — Dr. Kraemer has also taken the time to reach out to patients and family members suffering through the treatment process. He’s fostered the development of patient groups and attended patient funerals, and published more than 200 times in the scientific literature about XP and related DNA repair disorders — all whilwe working as a Commiwssioned Officer in twhe U.S. Public Health Service. “The disease is a very devastating one for the patients and the families, though many of them have learned to cope with the problems. We try to assist them in that effort.” • Dr. Kraemer organized a multidisciplinary clinic at the NIH for evaluation, counseling, and research on XP and related DNA repair disorders. • He has been the co-organizer of the DNA Repair Interest Group since 1985, as well as the first XP workshops to bring together researchers, clinicians, and patient support groups. • He established the Academy’s XP Expert Research Group, which meets each year at the Annual Meeting. Dr. Kraemer also serves as the group’s co-chair. • “A recent study showed that there was a more than 10,000-fold increase in the rate of skin cancer for these patients, so the goal is to diagnose early and institute measures of sun protection,” Dr. Kraemer said. “We deal with the patients, the families, their schools, and their environments. It’s a big issue.” • “The ability to help the patients has been the most rewarding aspect of studying XP,” he said. “When we first stating working in the ’70s, there were very little known about the genetics of XP, the molecular biology, and very little in the way of protection. Now there is a lot more known about the genetics, and a lot better protection.” –John carruthers Media highlight Working with your local media to educate your community about skin, hair, and nail conditions can benefit public health and raise the profile of your practice. The Acad-emy’s Media relations Toolkit contains custom-izable press materials that can be sent to local radio, television, and print publications. Visit the Toolkit at www.aad.org/member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit/sample-press-materials/sample-press-materials. recently, the Chicago Tribune (circulation: 441,506) published a letter to the editor from academy president ronald l. Moy, M.d. , about the dangers of indoor tanning. In the letter, Dr. Moy commended the Tribune for its editorial in support of proposed legislation to ban indoor tanning for minors in Illinois. To read this article and other dermatology sto-ries in the news, visit the Academy’s Media relations Toolkit. –Kara JileK 44 Dermatology WorlD //May 2011 www.aad.org

Accolades

Drs. Guttman, Choate win Young Investigators Award<br /> <br /> Two promising young dermatologic researchers were named the winners of the Academy’s 2011 Young Investigators in Dermatology Award at the 69th Annual Meeting. Yale University dermatologist Keith A. Choate, M.D., Ph.D., and Weill Cornell Medical College dermatology resident Emma Guttman, M.D., were selected based on their research and commitment to contributing to the specialty literature.<br /> <br /> Dr. Guttman’s research focuses on Th17 responses in atopic dermatitis. Her work demonstrated decreased expression of IL-17 and IL-23 in chronic atopic dermatitis skin lesions when compared to psoriasis. She also identified differences in terminal differentiation between atopic dermatitis and psoriasis.<br /> <br /> Dr. Choate’s research focuses on the genetic basis of the disorder ichthyosis with confetti. His work on the topic has led to publication in Science and a National Institutes of Health Mentored Clinical Scientist Research Career Development Award, or K08 award.<br /> <br /> Physicians in accredited dermatology residency programs or those who have completed their residencies within the last two years are eligible for the awards. For more information visit www.aad.org/education-and-quality-care/awards-grantsand- scholarships/young-investigators-award.<br /> <br /> Members Making A Difference: Kenneth Kraemer, M.d.<br /> <br /> NIH DerMATOlOgIsT sTuDIes XP, Offers PATIeNTs suPPOrT<br /> <br /> DerMatologist Kenneth KraeMer, M.d., who works in the DNA Repair Section of the National Cancer Institute, has made a substantial career out of studying the rare genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The autosomal recessive disorder leaves patients without the ability to repair the damage cause by ultraviolet light. Dr. Kraemer has studied XP patients at the National Institutes of Health since 1971, evaluating more than 100 patients and their family members free of charge. In addition to scientific breakthroughs — notably the use of oral retinoids to prevent skin cancer in XP patients — Dr. Kraemer has also taken the time to reach out to patients and family members suffering through the treatment process. He’s fostered the development of patient groups and attended patient funerals, and published more than 200 times in the scientific literature about XP and related DNA repair disorders — all whilme working as a Commimssioned Officer in tmhe U. S. Public Health Service.<br /> <br /> “The disease is a very devastating one for the patients and the families, though many of them have learned to cope with the problems. We try to assist them in that effort.”<br /> <br /> • Dr. Kraemer organized a multidisciplinary clinic at the NIH for evaluation, counseling, and research on XP and related DNA repair disorders.<br /> <br /> • He has been the co-organizer of the DNA Repair Interest Group since 1985, as well as the first XP workshops to bring together researchers, clinicians, and patient support groups.<br /> <br /> • He established the Academy’s XP Expert Research Group, which meets each year at the Annual Meeting. Dr. Kraemer also serves as the group’s co-chair.<br /> <br /> • “A recent study showed that there was a more than 10,000-fold increase in the rate of skin cancer for these patients, so the goal is to diagnose early and institute measures of sun protection,” Dr. Kraemer said. “We deal with the patients, the families, their schools, and their environments. It’s a big issue.”<br /> <br /> • “The ability to help the patients has been the most rewarding aspect of studying XP,” he said. “When we first stating working in the ’70s, there were very little known about the genetics of XP, the molecular biology, and very little in the way of protection. Now there is a lot more known about the genetics, and a lot better protection.”

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