Dermatology World April 2011 : Page 42

accolades Emory dermatologist serves as AAMC chair he Association of American Medical Colleges recently named dermatologist T homas J. Lawley, M.D., a professor of dermatology at Emory University in At-lanta, as the new chair of the organization’s board of directors. Dr. Lawley, who is also the dean of the school of medicine at Emory, will chair the AAMC board through October. He is an expert in autoim-mune skin diseases, producing research on the regulation of cell adhesion models and infl ammation. As dean, a position he has held since 1996, he has multiplied the school’s NIH funding fi ve-fold, to $265 million. “It is a tremendous honor for me to lead such a dedicated and diverse group of individuals in my new role as chair of the board of directors of the Association of American Medi-cal Colleges,” Dr. Lawley said. “I look forward to continuing to help steer the nation’s health care agenda and the impor-tant dialogue on the issues aff ecting our future.” – J o h n ca r r u t h e r s celebrating members Members Making A Difference:  Jeffrey thompson, d.o. D E R M ATO LOG I ST T R AV E L S TO H A I T I TO  P ROV I D E V I TA L M E D I CA L CA R E T dermatoloGist Jeffrey thompson, d.o., believes in providing essential care for the world’s most underserved patients. Following the cataclysmic 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Dr. T hompson leveraged connections through his church to travel with a handful of physicians to a small village near Port-au-Prince. Patient demand was incred-ibly high — a number of patients made daylong journeys on foot to receive care and stayed outdoors overnight when demand proved too high to receive care on the day of their arrival. T he only breaks in treatment, Dr. T hompson said, came when the physicians were too fatigued at the end of the day to continue. With a complete lack of medical supplies in the area, the group had to carefully coordinate their trip to maximize the care they were able to deliver. Dr. T hompson has remained an active vol-unteer in Haiti, as well as other developing nations. media highlight In order to position the specialty of dermatology, the Acad-emy maintains relationships with a variety of media nation-wide. On average, Academy staff members respond to 200  media inquiries monthly and provide referrals to Academy  members for interviews.  Recently, Academy members  ellen marmur, m.d. ,  Jessica Wu, m.d. ,  hema sundaram, m.d. , and  heather Woolery-lloyd, m.d. , were featured in an article titled “Sen-sational Skin” in the February  issue of Fitness (circulation:  1,515,065). In the article, each  dermatologist discussed  potential challenges and  treatments associated with  a specific skin tone. To read  this article and other derma-tology stories in the news,  visit the Academy’s Media  Relations Toolkit at www. aad.org/member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit.    –Kara JileK “T here are so many rewards. I think the most noticeable one for me was the sense of really making a diff erence — the people were just so appreciative. T hey just didn’t expect anything. T here was no sense of entitlement. Even the smallest little gesture on our part was met with gratitude.” • Dr. Thompson’s group saw hundreds of patients each day, with 100 to 200 often showing up hours before the physicians began the day’s work. • In addition to providing vital medical care, Dr. T hompson’s group also provided dental care to patients. For many of these villagers, even those in their 50s, it was the fi rst time in their lives they were aff orded access to a dentist. • “We saw every kind of disease — from infectious diseases like tu-berculosis and pneumonia to uncontrolled hypertension, scabies, and parasitic infection. T he patients were genuinely appreciative and very glad to see us,” he said. “What hit me fi rst was the poverty and the subsistence lifestyle that the villagers endured — a lack of food, of fresh water, of cleanliness. T here were just no resources.” • Dr. Thompson has taken fi ve trips to deliver care to Haiti, as well as three trips to the Dominican Republic. dw – J o h n ca r r u t h e r s 42   Dermatology WorlD  // April 2011 www.aad.org

Accolades

Emory dermatologist serves as AAMC chair<br /> <br /> The Association of American Medical Colleges recently named dermatologist Thomas J. Lawley, M.D., a professor of dermatology at Emory University in Atlanta, as the new chair of the organization’s board of directors. Dr. Lawley, who is also the dean of the school of medicine at Emory, will chair the AAMC board through October. He is an expert in autoimmune skin diseases, producing research on the regulation of cell adhesion models and inflammation. As dean, a position he has held since 1996, he has multiplied the school’s NIH funding five-fold, to $265 million.<br /> <br /> “It is a tremendous honor for me to lead such a dedicated and diverse group of individuals in my new role as chair of the board of directors of the Association of American Medical Colleges,” Dr. Lawley said. “I look forward to continuing to help steer the nation’s health care agenda and the important dialogue on the issues affecting our future.”–John carruthers<br /> <br /> media highlight<br /> <br /> In order to position the specialty of dermatology, the Academy maintains relationships with a variety of media nationwide.On average, Academy staff members respond to 200 media inquiries monthly and provide referrals to Academy members for interviews.<br /> <br /> Recently, Academy members ellen marmur, m.d., Jessica Wu, m.d., hema sundaram, m.d., and heather Woolery-lloyd, m.d., were featured in an article titled “Sensational Skin” in the February issue of Fitness (circulation: 1,515,065). In the article, each dermatologist discussed potential challenges and treatments associated with a specific skin tone. To read this article and other dermatology stories in the news, visit the Academy’s Media Relations Toolkit at www.Aad.org/member-tools-andbenefits/ media-relationstoolkit.–Kara JileK<br /> <br /> DERMATOLOGIST TRAVELS TO HAITI TO PROVIDE VITAL MEDICAL CARE<br /> <br /> DermatoloGist Jeffrey thompson, d.o., believes in providing essential care for the world’s most underserved patients. Following the cataclysmic 2010 earthquake in Haiti, Dr. Thompson leveraged connections through his church to travel with a handful of physicians to a small village near Port-au-Prince. Patient demand was incredibly high — a number of patients made daylong journeys on foot to receive care and stayed outdoors overnight when demand proved too high to receive care on the day of their arrival. The only breaks in treatment, Dr. Thompson said, came when the physicians were too fatigued at the end of the day to continue.With a complete lack of medical supplies in the area, the group had to carefully coordinate their trip to maximize the care they were able to deliver. Dr. Thompson has remained an active volunteer in Haiti, as well as other developing nations.<br /> <br /> • Dr. Thompson’s group saw hundreds of patients each day, with 100 to 200 often showing up hours before the physicians began the day’s work.<br /> <br /> • In addition to providing vital medical care, Dr. Thompson’s group also provided dental care to patients. For many of these villagers, even those in their 50s, it was the first time in their lives they were afforded access to a dentist.<br /> <br /> • “We saw every kind of disease — from infectious diseases like tuberculosis and pneumonia to uncontrolled hypertension, scabies, and parasitic infection. The patients were genuinely appreciative and very glad to see us,” he said. “What hit me first was the poverty and the subsistence lifestyle that the villagers endured — a lack of food, of fresh water, of cleanliness. There were just no resources.”<br /> <br /> • Dr. Thompson has taken five trips to deliver care to Haiti, as well as three trips to the Dominican Republic.

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