Dermatology World January 2011 : Page 42

accolades celebrating members James Nordlund, M.D., named AAD Master Dermatologist 2011 honoree builds legaCy of eduCaTional and researCh eXCellenCe members making a difference:  Ronald Falcon, M.D. free CliniC offers speCialTy  Care To long island’s mosT underserved DERMATOLOGIST RONALD FALCON, M.D., T he American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Master Dermatologist Award recognizes a member who, throughout the span of his or her career, has made signifi cant contri-butions to the specialty of dermatology, as well as to the leadership and/or educational programs of the Academy. This year’s honoree, James Nordlund, M.D., professor of clinical dermatology at Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, will be presented with the award at next month’s Annual Meeting in New Orleans. Dr. Nordlund was recognized by his colleagues for his selfl ess volunteerism as well as his incredible track record as a researcher and educator. What many of them may not know is that Dr. Nordlund’s career in dermatology began as the result of a bet following his medical education at the University of Minnesota. “When I was starting in medical school, I started out wanting to be a family practitioner, then I wanted to be an internist, and after that actually started specializing in oncology, and was working at the National Cancer Institute. Then, by a little bit of serendipity, I met my now-colleague, Dr. Sidney Klaus,” Dr. Nordlund said. “We had a bet — he bet me that I couldn’t do dermatology, and I said that I could. After that, I had my interview and went into dermatology. Probably the best thing I could have done, and I’m very grateful to him.” He has been busy since choosing dermatology. A frequent recipient of research grants, Dr. Nordlund has two patents to his name, and he has served on the board of directors for several societies, including the Society for Investigative Dermatology, the Noah Worcester Dermatological Society, and the AAD. He’s lectured around the globe and served as a reviewer for more than a dozen medical publications. Yet when queried about his most gratifying professional achievement, Dr. Nordlund said that the ability to pass on his knowledge to young physicians is the work with the most lasting eff ect. “One of the wonderful things that I’ve done in my career is being involved with the education of young students. I don’t even know how many I’ve had anymore. They come from all over with an interest in medicine and the sciences, and they’re able to take this knowledge back to their countries and apply it there,” he said. “It’s a real highlight to be involved in the education of young minds.” –JOHN CARRUTHERS “It’s a real highlight to be involved in the education of young minds.” has volunteered in the dermatology clinic of Long Beach Medical Center for 21 years, seeing patients at the lowest eco-nomic strata, many of whom have acute dermatologic problems. He is also active in his local community, volunteering for a number of causes in the city where he grew up. “ I feel that if all M.D.s donated four hours a week — or even four hours a month — we could cover the uninsured population and help alleviate our health care crisis.” “ I volunteer because I am blessed with three wonderful children and a wife who will agree that it is our job to help repair the world.” • He provides care at the free clinic as the only physician on clinic staff to refuse compensation from the hospital. • Most patients at the clinic report that they’re able to pay between $0 and $40 for all procedures and lab work provided. • He provides education and lectures on skin cancer awareness and sun protection to lifeguards and civic groups in his community. dw –JOHN CARRUTHERS Media Highlight DERMATOLOGY STORIES ARE COVERED   by print and broadcast  media outlets throughout the united states on a daily basis.  in the oct. 21 issue of  USA Today  (circulation 1.8 million), paul  friedman, m.d., patricia farris, m.d., and margaret parsons,  m.d., educated readers about treatments available for common  skin conditions, such as acne and rosacea. To see other derma-tology stories in the news, visit the academy’s media relations  Toolkit at www.aad.org/members/media . –KARA JILEK 42   Dermatology WorlD  // January 2011  // January 2011 www.aad.org

Accolades

The American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) Master Dermatologist Award recognizes a member who, throughout the span of his or her career, has made signifi cant contributions to the specialty of dermatology, as well as to the leadership and/or educational programs of the Academy. This year’s honoree, James Nordlund, M.D., professor of clinical dermatology at Wright State University’s Boonshoft School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio, will be presented with the award at next month’s Annual Meeting in New Orleans.<br /> <br /> Dr. Nordlund was recognized by his colleagues for his selfl ess volunteerism as well as his incredible track record as a researcher and educator. What many of them may not know is that Dr. Nordlund’s career in dermatology began as the result of a bet following his medical education at the University of Minnesota.<br /> <br /> “When I was starting in medical school, I started out wanting to be a family practitioner, then I wanted to be an internist, and after that actually started specializing in oncology, and was working at the National Cancer Institute. Then, by a little bit of serendipity, I met my now-colleague, Dr. Sidney Klaus,” Dr. Nordlund said. “We had a bet — he bet me that I couldn’t do dermatology, and I said that I could. After that, I had my interview and went into dermatology. Probably the best thing I could have done, and I’m very grateful to him.”<br /> <br /> He has been busy since choosing dermatology. A frequent recipient of research grants, Dr. Nordlund has two patents to his name, and he has served on the board of directors for several societies, including the Society for Investigative Dermatology, the Noah Worcester Dermatological Society, and the AAD. He’s lectured around the globe and served as a reviewer for more than a dozen medical publications. Yet when queried about his most gratifying professional achievement, Dr. Nordlund said that the ability to pass on his knowledge to young physicians is the work with the most lasting eff ect.<br /> <br /> “One of the wonderful things that I’ve done in my career is being involved with the education of young students. I don’t even know how many I’ve had anymore. They come from all over with an interest in medicine and the sciences, and they’re able to take this knowledge back to their countries and apply it there,” he said. “It’s a real highlight to be involved in the education of young minds.”<br /> <br /> Media Highlight<br /> <br /> DERMATOLOGY STORIES ARE COVERED by print and broadcast media outlets throughout the united states on a daily basis. In the oct. 21 issue of USA Today (circulation 1.8 million), paul friedman, m.d., patricia farris, m.d., and margaret parsons, m. d., educated readers about treatments available for common skin conditions, such as acne and rosacea. To see other dermatology stories in the news, visit the academy’s media relations Toolkit at www.aad.org/members/media.<br /> <br /> members making a difference: Ronald Falcon, M.D.<br /> <br /> DERMATOLOGIST RONALD FALCON, M.D., has volunteered in the dermatology clinic of Long Beach Medical Center for 21 years, seeing patients at the lowest economic strata, many of whom have acute dermatologic problems. He is also active in his local community, volunteering for a number of causes in the city where he grew up.<br /> <br /> “ I feel that if all M.D.s donated four hours a week — or even four hours a month — we could cover the uninsured population and help alleviate our health care crisis.”<br /> <br /> I volunteer because I am blessed with three wonderful children and a wife who will agree that it is our job to help repair the world.”<br /> <br /> • He provides care at the free clinic as the only physician on clinic staff to refuse compensation from the hospital.<br /> <br /> • Most patients at the clinic report that they’re able to pay between $0 and $40 for all procedures and lab work provided.<br /> <br /> • He provides education and lectures on skin cancer awareness and sun protection to lifeguards and civic groups in his community.

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