The SAA archaeological record May 2010 : Page 2

the SAArchaeological record The Magazine of the Society for American Archaeology Volume 10, No. 3 May 2010 The SAA Archaeological Record (ISSN 1532-7299) is published five times a year and is edited by Jane Eva Baxter. Submissions should be sent to Jane Eva Baxter, jbaxter@ depaul.edu, DePaul University, Department of Anthropology, 2343 North Racine, Chicago, IL 60614 Deadlines for submissions are: December 1 (January), February 1 (March), April 1 (May), August 1 (September), and October 1 (November). Advertising and place- ment ads should be sent to SAA headquarters, 900 Second St., NE #12, Washington, DC 20002, (202) 789-8200. The SAA Archaeological Record is provided free to members and insti- tutional subscribers to American Antiquity and Latin American Antiq- uity worldwide. The SAA Archaeo- logical Record can be found on the Web in PDF format at www.saa.org. SAA publishes The SAA Archaeolog- ical Record as a service to its mem- bers and constituencies. SAA, its editors and staff are not responsible for the content, opinions and infor- mation contained in The SAA Archaeological Record. SAA, its edi- tors and staff disclaim all war- ranties with regard to such content, opinions and information pub- lished in The SAA Archaeological Record by any individual or organi- zation; this disclaimer includes all implied warranties of mer- chantability and fitness. In no event shall SAA, its editors and staff be liable for any special, indirect, or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting from loss of use, data, or profits, arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of any content, opinions or information included in The SAA Archaeological Record. Copyright ©2010 by the Society for American Archaeology. All Rights Reserved. his issue of The SAA Archaeological Record brings my tenure as editor to a close. It has been a great pleasure to serve as editor and I am grateful for the opportu- nity. The incoming editor is Jane Baxter, and new manuscripts and other items should be submitted to her at the following: T Jane Eva Baxter (jbaxter@depaul.edu) DePaul University Department of Anthropology 2343 North Racine Chicago, IL 60614 This issue features a group of papers on the issue of “Working Together on Race and Racialism in American Archaeology,” initially triggered by a contribution from Roger Echo- Hawk. This collection was developed, solicited, and edited by Kurt Dongoske and Larry Zimmerman, and the contributors provide a number of important perspectives on a topic that remains deeply entrenched in society— race. I, and the authors, hope this generates further discussion among the SAA membership and beyond, the start of which can be found in this group of papers. The remainder of the issue features six articles and materials from the SAA Annual Meeting just held in St. Louis. This begins with a report from Ira Matt, recipient of an NSF scholarship awarded through the SAA, discussing how he has used this opportuni- ty. Marcia Bezerra discusses the difficulty we sometimes have in getting our points across to students, set in the context of heritage education in Brazil. I can attest to the fact that this problem is borderless. Daniel Contreras and Neil Brodie report on an innovative application of Google Earth for detecting, monitoring, and quantifying looting, one that they hope can help increase public awareness of site destruction. Jonathan Thomas and Anna Waterman provide us with a brief tour through the history of “revolutions” in archaeology. Steve Nash discusses tree- ring dating efforts at Mesa Verde National Park, noting that this research resource is nearing full exploitation. Don Holly then uses the discovery of a time capsule on his campus as an illustration of what archaeology is often able to do— provide alternative narratives. The issue closes with a report from the Board, notes from the business meeting, awards, and ceremonial resolutions, all of which derive from the 75th Anniversary Meeting of the SAA. In closing, I would like to thank all of who have contributed articles or items to The SAA Archaeological Record in the last three years. I would especially like to thank the active Associate Editors and John Neikirk (SAA Manager, Publications) for their time and work. As always, if you have written an article you would like to see in The SAA Archaeological Record, please send it in to Jane Baxter, the new editor (jbaxter@depaul.edu). 2 The SAA Archaeological Record • May 2010 EDITOR’S CORNER Andrew Duff Andrew Duff is an Associate Professor of anthropology at Washington State University.

Editor’s Corner

Andrew Duff

This issue of The SAA Archaeological Record brings my tenure as editor to a close. It has been a great pleasure to serve as editor and I am grateful for the opportunity. The incoming editor is Jane Baxter, and new manuscripts and other items should be submitted to her at the following: <br /> <br /> Jane Eva Baxter (jbaxter@depaul.edu) DePaul University Department of Anthropology 2343 North Racine Chicago, IL 60614 <br /> <br /> This issue features a group of papers on the issue of “Working Together on Race and Racialism in American Archaeology,” initially triggered by a contribution from Roger Echo- Hawk. This collection was developed, solicited, and edited by Kurt Dongoske and Larry Zimmerman, and the contributors provide a number of important perspectives on a topic that remains deeply entrenched in society— race. I, and the authors, hope this generates further discussion among the SAA membership and beyond, the start of which can be found in this group of papers.<br /> <br /> The remainder of the issue features six articles and materials from the SAA Annual Meeting just held in St. Louis. This begins with a report from Ira Matt, recipient of an NSF scholarship awarded through the SAA, discussing how he has used this opportunity. Marcia Bezerra discusses the difficulty we sometimes have in getting our points across to students, set in the context of heritage education in Brazil. I can attest to the fact that this problem is borderless. Daniel Contreras and Neil Brodie report on an innovative application of Google Earth for detecting, monitoring, and quantifying looting, one that they hope can help increase public awareness of site destruction. <br /> <br /> Jonathan Thomas and Anna Waterman provide us with a brief tour through the history of “revolutions” in archaeology. Steve Nash discusses tree- ring dating efforts at Mesa Verde National Park, noting that this research resource is nearing full exploitation. Don Holly then uses the discovery of a time capsule on his campus as an illustration of what archaeology is often able to do— provide alternative narratives. The issue closes with a report from the Board, notes from the business meeting, awards, and ceremonial resolutions, all of which derive from the 75th Anniversary Meeting of the SAA.<br /> <br /> In closing, I would like to thank all of who have contributed articles or items to The SAA Archaeological Record in the last three years. I would especially like to thank the active Associate Editors and John Neikirk (SAA Manager, Publications) for their time and work. As always, if you have written an article you would like to see in The SAA Archaeological Record, please send it in to Jane Baxter, the new editor (jbaxter@depaul.edu).<br /> <br />

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