Dermatology World December 2011 : Page 35

accolades Dermatologist runs marathon for Camp Discovery celebrating members accolades Members Making A Difference: Wilson Liao, M.D. VolunTeeRISM InfoRMS DeRMATologIST’S ReSeARch, WoRlDVIeW San FRanciSco DeRMatoLogiSt WiLSon Liao, M.D., has spent W hen Naples, Fla. dermatologist Cyndi Yag-Howard, M.D., crossed the finish line of the New York Marathon on Nov. 6, she did more than give herself a once-in-a-lifetime 48th birthday present. She did something that she never thought she would be able to do. Three years earlier, she had incurred a stress fracture in her hip and thought that her dream of running one marathon in her lifetime was unattainable. However, more important than accomplishing her marathon goal, she also helped en-sure that the parents of children with chronic skin diseases would feel the joy she did last summer when her own children returned from summer camp. “If I was going to train for something as big as a marathon, I wanted to do it for a cause,” Dr. Yag-Howard said. Her original plan was to raise money for ovarian cancer research in honor of her mother. But last summer, she said, “My kids went to summer camp in Maine for three weeks. They said it was the greatest experience of their lives. It made me realize how transformational camp can be, how it can give kids a confidence and a sense of self that they otherwise wouldn’t have — so Camp Discovery was the perfect charity.” Dr. Yag-Howard raised more than $5,000 by reaching out to friends, col-leagues and patients via email, Facebook and personal letters. She explained to them why she was running the marathon and provided a link to an online video about Camp Discovery (www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwrQw0nnRwk), as well as a link created by the AAD to make direct donations to the fund. Additionally, she placed a basket for donations at her office check out; in appreciation for their generosity, contributors were offered bracelets that Dr. Yag-Howard’s children learned to make while they were in summer camp. “Our children became part of the fundraiser, so it came around full circle,” she said proudly. “The Academy made it so easy. I told them what I wanted to do and they set up a Web page that allowed people to donate. Contributors automatically received a thank you letter from me when they donated,” she said, adding that she plans to follow-up on that letter with handmade bracelets for everyone who gave. To learn more about how you can follow Dr. Yag-Howard’s example, visit www.AADdevelopment.org/SustainingFund_SpecialEvents.html. – RicHaRD neLSon his medical career immersed in not only his specialty, but each community he’s been a part of. His work in mentoring has led him to guide minority youth in Boston into health care careers, provide music to patients in nursing homes and hospices, and provide treatment to the homeless population of San Francisco. “I was largely inspired to even go to medical school through the idea of serving the community.” • As an undergraduate, Dr. Liao spent time in rural areas of Africa and Asia, working with local physi-cians to provide treatment to patients without regular access to medical care. The experience, he said, largely inspired his career path. • During medical school, Dr. Liao was involved with both the Albert Schweitzer program, which encour-ages health professionals to become involved with community service, and the Martha Eliot Health Center Minority Youth Mentoring Program, which helps encourage minority youth to enter the health care field. • As a teacher at the University of California – San Francisco, Dr. Liao leads teams of residents in performing diagnoses and treatment at homeless shelters in the area. This work, he said, helps provide perspective for young physicians. • Dr. Liao endeavors to bring the lessons of serv-ing the community to his clinical research into the genetic basis of psoriasis. It can be easy, he said, for researchers to focus entirely on the science and lose sight of how patients live their lives with a given disease. Volunteering can remind physicians of why they entered medicine in the first place, he said. “Volunteerism has been a very important part of my career, and what defines me as a physician.” dw –JoHn caRRutHeRS Media Highlight In the Wall Street Journal article (circ. 2,092,000), “Reckoning With the Sun,” Ronald L. Moy, M.D. , president of the American Academy of Dermatology, and Susan H. Weinkle, M.D. , encouraged readers to examine their skin for signs of skin cancer. To read this article and other dermatology news, visit the Academy’s Media Relations Toolkit at www.aad.org/ member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit. -RoSe PaSoWicz Dermatology WorlD // December 2011 35

accolades

Richard nelson

<br /> Dermatologist runs marathon for Camp Discovery<br /> <br /> When Naples, Fla. dermatologist Cyndi Yag-Howard, M.D., crossed the finish line of the New York Marathon on Nov. 6, she did more than give herself a once-in-a-lifetime 48th birthday present. She did something that she never thought she would be able to do. Three years earlier, she had incurred a stress fracture in her hip and thought that her dream of running one marathon in her lifetime was unattainable. However, more important than accomplishing her marathon goal, she also helped ensure that the parents of children with chronic skin diseases would feel the joy she did last summer when her own children returned from summer camp.<br /> <br /> “If I was going to train for something as big as a marathon, I wanted to do it for a cause,” Dr. Yag-Howard said. Her original plan was to raise money for ovarian cancer research in honor of her mother. But last summer, she said, “My kids went to summer camp in Maine for three weeks. They said it was the greatest experience of their lives. It made me realize how transformational camp can be, how it can give kids a confidence and a sense of self that they otherwise wouldn’t have — so Camp Discovery was the perfect charity.”<br /> <br /> Dr. Yag-Howard raised more than $5,000 by reaching out to friends, colleagues and patients via email, Facebook and personal letters. She explained to them why she was running the marathon and provided a link to an online video about Camp Discovery (www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwrQw0nnRwk), as well as a link created by the AAD to make direct donations to the fund. Additionally, she placed a basket for donations at her office check out; in appreciation for their generosity, contributors were offered bracelets that Dr. Yag-Howard’s children learned to make while they were in summer camp. “Our children became part of the fundraiser, so it came around full circle,” she said proudly.<br /> <br /> “The Academy made it so easy. I told them what I wanted to do and they set up a Web page that allowed people to donate. Contributors automatically received a thank you letter from me when they donated,” she said, adding that she plans to follow-up on that letter with handmade bracelets for everyone who gave.<br /> <br /> To learn more about how you can follow Dr. Yag-Howard’s example, visit www.AADdevelopment.org/SustainingFund_SpecialEvents.html.<br /> <br /> Members Making A Difference: Wilson Liao, M.D.<br /> <br /> VOLUNTEERISM INFORMS DERMATOLOGIST’S RESEARCH, WORLDVIEW<br /> <br /> SAN FRANCISCO DERMATOLOGIST WILSON LIAO, M.D., has spent his medical career immersed in not only his specialty, but each community he’s been a part of. His work in mentoring has led him to guide minority youth in Boston into health care careers, provide music to patients in nursing homes and hospices, and provide treatment to the homeless population of San Francisco.<br /> <br /> • As an undergraduate, Dr. Liao spent time in rural areas of Africa and Asia, working with local physicians to provide treatment to patients without regular access to medical care. The experience, he said, largely inspired his career path.<br /> <br /> • During medical school, Dr. Liao was involved with both the Albert Schweitzer program, which encourages health professionals to become involved with community service, and the Martha Eliot Health Center Minority Youth Mentoring Program, which helps encourage minority youth to enter the health care field.<br /> <br /> • As a teacher at the University of California – San Francisco, Dr. Liao leads teams of residents in performing diagnoses and treatment at homeless shelters in the area. This work, he said, helps provide perspective for young physicians.<br /> <br /> • Dr. Liao endeavors to bring the lessons of serving the community to his clinical research into the genetic basis of psoriasis. It can be easy, he said, for researchers to focus entirely on the science and lose sight of how patients live their lives with a given disease. Volunteering can remind physicians of why they entered medicine in the first place, he said. “Volunteerism has been a very important part of my career, and what defines me as a physician.” dw –JOHN CARRUTHERS

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