Dermatology World September 2011 : Page 44

accolades Dermatologist helps tornado relief workers get sun protection celebrating members Members Making A Difference:  r. rox Anderson, m.d. DerMATologiST builDS CAreer  ArouND helpiNg ChilDreN bosTon dermATologisT r. rox Anderson, m.d., has made a career I n the wake of the devastating tornadoes that struck Joplin, Mo., in late May, the town found itself facing damages that the state department of insur-ance estimated in the billions of dollars. In addition to the months of work needed to clear a staggering amount of debris, the relief workers also faced the reality of working without shade — almost all of the area’s older trees had been uprooted or destroyed. Joplin dermatologist Derek Towery, M.D., contacted the Academy in hopes of reaching out to companies interested in providing sun protection to the people working to rebuild the city. “The trees in the area were pretty much down and gone, and there was no-where to retreat to. I was thinking there was going to be a significant need for sun protection. People are going to be getting some big burns because there are no doubt going to be a lot of hours spent in the sun during the next couple of months trying to clean things up,” Dr. Towery said. “I talked to some of my pharmaceutical reps, and also thought that the Academy might be able to help me get some things too, so I called the Member Resource Center.” As a result, Dr. Towery and the Academy, alongside corporate donors, were able to provide sun-protection items including hats and sunscreen. Donors included Coolibar, Inc., Fallene Ltd., Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company, and Niadyne, Inc. The region, Dr. Towery said, is slowly making progress toward rebuilding. “It’s moving along — probably not fast enough for most of us, but they’ve probably got 75 percent of the debris cleared. There are lots of empty lots now — a bare landscape compared to all the homes and trees that were there before. Hopefully the rebuilding process will start soon,” he said. “Things like shade structures are going to be important at the parks and schools.” out of helping children in need. He’s made it his mission to serve children in his roles as a teacher, physician, and scientist, whether in the U.S. or in Vietnam. Four years ago, he joined with Harvard residents and Vietnam war survivors Than Nga Tran, M.D., Ph.D., and Thuy Phung, M.D., Ph.D., as well as a number of doctors stateside and in that country, to set up a clinic for children with vascular anomalies in Ho Chi Minh City. Dr. Anderson and his colleagues worked to gather equipment and resources for the clinic, including a pulsed dye laser, fractional CO2 and alexandrite lasers, and training for local dermatologists. “It’s a pleasure to help people, particularly children, and especially in places where they don’t have a lot of resources. I think it’s amazing what you can do when you get the right group of people together.” • Every winter, Dr. Anderson travels back to Vietnam with Drs. Than and Phung, and the group spends a week or two treating patients and training local physi-cians and medical personnel. • “Before they had lasers, kids that had hemangiomas were treated with radioactive phosphorus, a technique that was being investigated in France during the 1950s,” Dr. Anderson said. “Vietnamese physicians learned this from the French — then the war happened and they were cut off.” As a result, he said, use of radioactive P-32 to treat hemangiomas continued for decades, leading to scarring, depigmentation, and eventually squamous cell carcinoma. “Our first priority was to stop the use of this as a treatment, then to find out how to solve the problems this has caused.” • In addition to his work in Vietnam, Dr. Anderson has assembled a group of physicians and scientists from MIT to improve treatments for vitiligo. The group seeks solutions that can work within the economic confines of a developing nation. dw –John cArruThers -John cArruThers media highlight Social media has become an increasingly popular method for commu-nicating directly with your target audience. To educate the public about  dermatologic conditions and engage them in conversations, the Acad-emy recently launched a Facebook page (www.facebook.com/pages/ American-Academy-of-Dermatology/235108183172006) and a Twitter feed  (@AADskin). if you are thinking about utilizing social media to communi-cate with your patients and your community, visit the  Academy’s Media relations Toolkit at www.aad.org/ member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit  for some frequently answered questions on the topic.  in  Elle’s  (circulation 1,095,702) recent article,  “burn rate,” dermatologists  david fisher, m.d., ph.d. ,  dennis gross m.d. , and  steven Q. wang, m.d. , discussed the dangers of tanning beds and  the importance of protecting yourself from the sun.  To read this article and other dermatology stories  in the news, visit the Academy’s Media relations  Toolkit.  -rose pAsowicz    44   Dermatology WorlD  // September 2011  // September 2011 www.aad.org

Dermatologist helps tornado relief workers get sun protection

JOHN CARRUTHERS

<br /> In the wake of the devastating tornadoes that struck Joplin, Mo., in late May, the town found itself facing damages that the state department of insurance estimated in the billions of dollars. In addition to the months of work needed to clear a staggering amount of debris, the relief workers also faced the reality of working without shade — almost all of the area’s older trees had been uprooted or destroyed. Joplin dermatologist Derek Towery, M.D., contacted the Academy in hopes of reaching out to companies interested in providing sun protection to the people working to rebuild the city.<br /> <br /> “The trees in the area were pretty much down and gone, and there was nowhere to retreat to. I was thinking there was going to be a significant need for sun protection. People are going to be getting some big burns because there are no doubt going to be a lot of hours spent in the sun during the next couple of months trying to clean things up,” Dr. Towery said. “I talked to some of my pharmaceutical reps, and also thought that the Academy might be able to help me get some things too, so I called the Member Resource Center.”<br /> <br /> As a result, Dr. Towery and the Academy, alongside corporate donors, were able to provide sun-protection items including hats and sunscreen. Donors included Coolibar, Inc., Fallene Ltd., Johnson & Johnson Consumer Products Company, and Niadyne, Inc.<br /> <br /> The region, Dr. Towery said, is slowly making progress toward rebuilding.<br /> <br /> “It’s moving along — probably not fast enough for most of us, but they’ve probably got 75 percent of the debris cleared. There are lots of empty lots now — a bare landscape compared to all the homes and trees that were there before. Hopefully the rebuilding process will start soon,” he said. “Things like shade structures are going to be important at the parks and schools.”<br /> <br />

DERMATOLOGIST BUILDS CAREER AROUND HELPING CHILDREN

R. Rox Anderson

<br /> BOSTON DERMATOLOGIST R. ROX ANDERSON, M.D., has made a career out of helping children in need. He’s made it his mission to serve children in his roles as a teacher, physician, and scientist, whether in the U.S. or in Vietnam. Four years ago, he joined with Harvard residents and Vietnam war survivors Than Nga Tran, M.D., Ph.D., and Thuy Phung, M.D., Ph.D., as well as a number of doctors stateside and in that country, to set up a clinic for children with vascular anomalies in Ho Chi Minh City. Dr. Anderson and his colleagues worked to gather equipment and resources for the clinic, including a pulsed dye laser, fractional CO2 and alexandrite lasers, and training for local dermatologists.<br /> <br /> “It’s a pleasure to help people, particularly children, and especially in places where they don’t have a lot of resources. I think it’s amazing what you can do when you get the right group of people together.”<br /> <br /> • Every winter, Dr. Anderson travels back to Vietnam with Drs. Than and Phung, and the group spends a week or two treating patients and training local physicians and medical personnel.<br /> • “Before they had lasers, kids that had hemangiomas were treated with radioactive phosphorus, a technique that was being investigated in France during the 1950s,” Dr. Anderson said. “Vietnamese physicians learned this from the French — then the war happened and they were cut off.” As a result, he said, use of radioactive P-32 to treat hemangiomas continued for decades, leading to scarring, depigmentation, and eventually squamous cell carcinoma. “Our first priority was to stop the use of this as a treatment, then to find out how to solve the problems this has caused.”<br /> • In addition to his work in Vietnam, Dr. Anderson has assembled a group of physicians and scientists from MIT to improve treatments for vitiligo. The group seeks solutions that can work within the economic confines of a developing nation.<br /> –JOHN CARRUTHERS<br />

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