Dermatology World August 2011 : Page 44

accolades Candidate donates coffers to Camp Discovery he Academy has received a generous Sustaining Fund donation for Camp Discovery from former Florida state senate candidate Miranda Rosenberg. Rosenberg, the daughter of Palm Beach, Fla. dermatologist Steven Rosenberg, M.D., recently completed an independent run for a seat in the state’s senate but ultimately lost the election. Election law in Florida allows residual campaign funds to be donated, and Rosenberg decided to contribute her remaining campaign fund — much of it raised from dermatologists — to Camp Discovery. “I received a lot of support from dermatologists in my campaign. I’ve always admired how they cared about their patients and the quality of care that they receive, and they’re always proud of Camp Discovery,” Rosenberg said. “It made sense to give the leftover funds from my campaign to people who would use it to make the lives of children better.” Rosenberg, who graduated from Harvard University with a degree in government and is a former fellow for the Tony Blair Faith Foundation, received more than 6,500 votes running as an independent against two opponents who col-lectively spent more than $4 million during the campaign. -JohN carruthErs celebrating members Members Making A Difference: Joel bamford, m.d. DerMAtologist volunteers ArounD the worlD duluth, miNN., dErmatologist JoEl bamford, m.d., began volunteering abroad T with a Project Hope trip to Ecuador as a medical student in 1963. After taking a few years off and training as a dermatologist, he resumed traveling internationally to apply his medical training to both physician teaching and providing care to the underserved with the Christian Medical Society (CMS) in 1980. Since then, he’s completed an impressive number of overseas trips to educate foreign medical students and treat patients. “My entire involvement with volunteer trips has been rewarding — seeing the in-office medical student education, witnessing examinations, quizzing the students. I’ve seen the high quality of dermatologic education that’s available around the world. I’m glad that I’ve gotten to see a number of beautiful countries, meet new people, and interact with other doctors.” • Since becoming involved with international volunteerism, Dr. Bamford has completed more than a dozen teaching trips to a var-ied number of locales including Honduras, India, and Cameroon. • In addition to his overseas trips, Dr. Bamford works at The Duluth Clinic one day a week, reviews articles for a number of journals, and volunteers with local medical students at a Duluth homeless shelter. • On his first trip with CMS to Honduras, Dr. Bamford brought his then-12-year-old daughter, Sarah, who became a physician. • During trips to Cameroon and Bangalore, India, Dr. Bamford saw first-hand the difference that AIDS medicines have made in those communities. “I learned quite a bit from the internist who ran the AIDS clinic in Niger,” he said. “I was impressed how American donation of medicines had such an impact.” • “I’m not sure what I’ll do next,” Dr. Bamford said. “As I get closer to full retirement, I’ve been working more to contribute to evidence-based medicine.” dw media highlight the u.s. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released new sunscreen regulations in June. At the FDA’s request, Academy President ronald l. Moy, M.D., addressed skin cancer incidence and prevention at its press conference. visit the Academy’s Media relations toolkit at www.aad.org/ member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit for the news release, talking points, and FAQs to help you answer questions from patients or the media. the sunscreen regulations received tremendous media coverage throughout the country. USA Today (circulation: 1,825,000) featured an article that explained the new sun-screen rules and quoted ronald moy, m.d. , darrell rigel, m.d. , and henry lim, m.d. in addition, The New York Times (circulation: 950,000) published an article on the rules that featured warwick morison, m.d. to read these articles and other dermatol-ogy stories in the news, visit the Academy’s Media rela-tions toolkit. – Kara JilEK –JohN carruthErs 44 Dermatology WorlD // August 2011 www.aad.org

accolades

JOHN CARRUTHERS

<br /> Candidate donates coffers to Camp Discovery<br /> <br /> The Academy has received a generous Sustaining Fund donation for Camp Discovery from former Florida state senate candidate Miranda Rosenberg. Rosenberg, the daughter of Palm Beach, Fla. dermatologist Steven Rosenberg, M.D., recently completed an independent run for a seat in the state’s senate but ultimately lost the election. Election law in Florida allows residual campaign funds to be donated, and Rosenberg decided to contribute her remaining campaign fund — much of it raised from dermatologists — to Camp Discovery.<br /> <br /> “I received a lot of support from dermatologists in my campaign. I’ve always admired how they cared about their patients and the quality of care that they receive, and they’re always proud of Camp Discovery,” Rosenberg said. “It made sense to give the leftover funds from my campaign to people who would use it to make the lives of children better.”<br /> <br /> Rosenberg, who graduated from Harvard University with a degree in government and is a former fellow for the Tony Blair Faith Foundation, received more than 6,500 votes running as an independent against two opponents who collectively spent more than $4 million during the campaign.

Members Making A Difference: Joel Bamford, M.D.

JOHN CARRUTHERS

<br /> DULUTH, MINN., DERMATOLOGIST JOEL BAMFORD, M.D., began volunteering abroad with a Project Hope trip to Ecuador as a medical student in 1963. After taking a few years off and training as a dermatologist, he resumed traveling internationally to apply his medical training to both physician teaching and providing care to the underserved with the Christian Medical Society (CMS) in 1980. Since then, he’s completed an impressive number of overseas trips to educate foreign medical students and treat patients.<br /> <br /> “My entire involvement with volunteer trips has been rewarding — seeing the in-office medical student education, witnessing examinations, quizzing the students. I’ve seen the high quality of dermatologic education that’s available around the world. I’m glad that I’ve gotten to see a number of beautiful countries, meet new people, and interact with other doctors.”<br /> <br /> • Since becoming involved with international volunteerism, Dr. Bamford has completed more than a dozen teaching trips to a varied number of locales including Honduras, India, and Cameroon.<br /> • In addition to his overseas trips, Dr. Bamford works at The Duluth Clinic one day a week, reviews articles for a number of journals, and volunteers with local medical students at a Duluth homeless shelter.<br /> • On his first trip with CMS to Honduras, Dr. Bamford brought his then-12-year-old daughter, Sarah, who became a physician.<br /> • During trips to Cameroon and Bangalore, India, Dr. Bamford saw first-hand the difference that AIDS medicines have made in those communities. “I learned quite a bit from the internist who ran the AIDS clinic in Niger,” he said. “I was impressed how American donation of medicines had such an impact.”<br /> • “I’m not sure what I’ll do next,” Dr. Bamford said. “As I get closer to full retirement, I’ve been working more to contribute to evidencebased medicine.”

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