Dermatology World July 2011 : Page 52

accolades Samuel Moschella, M.D., wins Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award n recognition of his commitment to compassionate, patient-centered care, Burlington, Mass., dermatolo-gist Samuel Moschella, M.D., was selected as the latest recipient of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award presented with the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Moschella, who has been named an AAD Member Making a Difference winner and was named a Master Der-matologist in 1992, was nominated for his respect for patients, their family members, and co-workers, in addition to his dermatologic excellence. The Humanism in Medicine award was presented to Dr. Moschella at the 69th Annual Meeting in New Orleans. In receiving the award, Dr. Moschella said that he was honored to be a recipient, and that his upbringing had a great deal of influence on his abil-ity to provide compassionate care. “First, I want to thank the Gold Foundation for this prestigious award. I grew up in a very religious environment. When I decided to go to medical school, my grandmother was very disappointed since she was sure I would become a clergyman,” Dr. Moschella said. “I explained to her there were two types of healers, the corporal healer and the spiritual healer. I told her as a physician I could be both.” The award was created more than 20 years ago by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation to recognize physicians who demonstrate exceptional commit-ment to patient care. Since 2010, the Academy has co-presented the award with the foundation at its Annual Meeting. To learn more or nominate someone, visit www.aad.org/education-and-quality-care/awards-grants-and-scholarships/gold-foundation-humanism-in-medicine-award. -John cArruThers celebrating members Members Making A Difference:  elizabeth Jacobson, m.d. DerMAtologist opens Doors   to rurAl prActitioners BirminGhAm, AlA., dermAToloGisT elizABeTh JAcoBson, m.d., has a I passion for improving health care in her state. Two years ago, she recog-nized a shortage of access to derma-tology in rural Alabama. To address it, she became involved with a family practice residency program to better equip doctors in training with a ba-sic dermatologic skill set. In addition, when lecturing at a state meeting of family practitioners, she offered to make herself available to any physician hoping to learn some basic dermatology skills. As a result, she has assisted a number of current and future family practitioners to provide better dermatologic care. “I’m so excited about being able to do this, and the truth is I learn so much from them — they see things with a different set of eyes.” • “Many family practitioners have not had the benefit of a dermatology rotation, so they may not be aware of the reasons we choose shave or punch biopsy,” Dr. Jacobson said. “This clarification can make a significant difference to the dermatopathologist who is reading the slide, allow-ing an accurate diagnosis to be made.” • “In a relatively short amount of time, I can get a family practice doctor up to speed on some very basic derma-tologic information and skills,” she said. “[They] are not trying to learn how to be dermatologists, but they are encountering rashes and lesions that need to be attended to and trying to do the best they can in this situation.” • Most of the physicians who spend time learning from Dr. Jacobson are in areas where there are no dermatolo-gists within 100 miles and/or there are no available appointments for three to six months. In addition, many patients are elderly or do not have the means to travel. • The rural physicians who spend time in Dr. Jacobson’s office often stay in touch, sending photos and treat-ment questions over email. “I admire their willingness to take the time away from their practices to become better physisicans,” she said. “My doors are always open to physicians who want to provide better care for their patients!” dw –John cArruThers media highlight the Academy’s Media relations toolkit has information on current derma-tology issues in the news. the toolkit provides summaries of hot topics and  links to news releases, position statements and other background materi-als to help you prepare for patient inquiries and media interviews. the  Academy’s Media relations toolkit can be found at  www.aad.org/member-tools-and-benefits/media-relations-toolkit.  in recognition of Melanoma/skin cancer De-tection and prevention Month ® ,  USA Today  (circula-tion: 1,825,000), featured a three-part series on  the prevention and treatment of skin cancer that  quoted Academy president  ronald l. moy, m.d. ,  ellen marmur, m.d. ,  sonia Badreshia-Bansal, m.d. ,  Jocelyn lieb, m.d. ,  Joshua zeichner, m.d. ,  david leffell, m.d. , and  darrell rigel, m.d.  to  read these articles and other dermatology stories  in the news, visit the Academy’s Media relations  toolkit.   – kArA Jilek 52   Dermatology WorlD  //July 2011  //July 2011 www.aad.org

Accolades

Samuel Moschella, M.D., wins Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award<br /> <br /> In recognition of his commitment to compassionate, patient-centered care, Burlington, Mass., dermatologist Samuel Moschella, M.D., was selected as the latest recipient of the Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award presented with the American Academy of Dermatology. Dr. Moschella, who has been named an AAD Member Making a Difference winner and was named a Master Dermatologist in 1992, was nominated for his respect for patients, their family members, and co-workers, in addition to his dermatologic excellence. The Humanism in Medicine award was presented to Dr. Moschella at the 69th Annual Meeting in New Orleans.<br /> <br /> In receiving the award, Dr. Moschella said that he was honored to be a recipient, and that his upbringing had a great deal of influence on his ability to provide compassionate care.<br /> <br /> “First, I want to thank the Gold Foundation for this prestigious award. I grew up in a very religious environment. When I decided to go to medical school, my grandmother was very disappointed since she was sure I would become a clergyman,” Dr. Moschella said. “I explained to her there were two types of healers, the corporal healer and the spiritual healer. I told her as a physician I could be both.”<br /> <br /> The award was created more than 20 years ago by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation to recognize physicians who demonstrate exceptional commitment to patient care. Since 2010, the Academy has co-presented the award with the foundation at its Annual Meeting. To learn more or nominate someone, visit www.aad.org/education-and-quality-care/awards-grants-andscholarships/ gold-foundation-humanism-in-medicine-award.<br /> <br /> - JOHN CARRUTHERS<br /> <br /> media highlight<br /> <br /> The Academy’s Media relations toolkit has information on current dermatology issues in the news. The toolkit provides summaries of hot topics and links to news releases, position statements and other background materials to help you prepare for patient inquiries and media interviews. The Academy’s Media relations toolkit can be found at www.aad.org/member-tools-and-benefits/mediarelations-toolkit.<br /> <br /> In recognition of Melanoma/skin cancer Detection and prevention Month®, USA Today (circulation: 1,825,000), featured a three-part series on the prevention and treatment of skin cancer that quoted Academy president ronald l. moy, m.d., ellen marmur, m.d., sonia Badreshia-Bansal, m. d., Jocelyn lieb, m.d., Joshua zeichner, m.d., david leffell, m.d., and darrell rigel, m.d. to read these articles and other dermatology stories in the news, visit the Academy’s Media relations toolkit. – KARA JILEK<br /> <br /> Members Making A Difference: Elizabeth Jacobson, M.D.<br /> <br /> DERMATOLOGIST OPENS DOORS TO RURAL PRACTITIONERS<br /> <br /> BIRMINGHAM, ALA., DERMATOLOGIST ELIZABETH JACOBSON, M.D., has a passion for improving health care in her state. Two years ago, she recognized a shortage of access to dermatology in rural Alabama. To address it, she became involved with a family practice residency program to better equip doctors in training with a basic dermatologic skill set. In addition, when lecturing at a state meeting of family practitioners, she offered to make herself available to any physician hoping to learn some basic dermatology skills. As a result, she has assisted a number of current and future family practitioners to provide better dermatologic care.<br /> <br /> “I’m so excited about being able to do this, and the truth is I learn so much from them — they see things with a different set of eyes.”<br /> <br /> • “Many family practitioners have not had the benefit of a dermatology rotation, so they may not be aware of the reasons we choose shave or punch biopsy,” Dr. Jacobson said. “This clarification can make a significant difference to the dermatopathologist who is reading the slide, allowing an accurate diagnosis to be made.”<br /> <br /> • “In a relatively short amount of time, I can get a family practice doctor up to speed on some very basic dermatologic information and skills,” she said. “[They] are not trying to learn how to be dermatologists, but they are encountering rashes and lesions that need to be attended to and trying to do the best they can in this situation.”<br /> <br /> • Most of the physicians who spend time learning from Dr. Jacobson are in areas where there are no dermatologists within 100 miles and/or there are no available appointments for three to six months. In addition, many patients are elderly or do not have the means to travel.<br /> <br /> • The rural physicians who spend time in Dr. Jacobson’s office often stay in touch, sending photos and treatment questions over email. “I admire their willingness to take the time away from their practices to become better physisicans,” she said. “My doors are always open to physicians who want to provide better care for their patients!” - JOHN CARRUTHERS

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