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Hope College December 2013 : Page 6

Campus A Greater Scene Hope Visiting enrich A Scholars Learning Nobel laureate Dr. Thomas r. Cech speaks with students during an informal reception at the A. paul schaap science Center while on campus in November through the college’s new Dr. Harrison C. Visscher ’51 and Dr. robert D. Visscher ’51 n appreciative Hope community e ngaged with visiting Nobel Laureate Dr. Thomas R. Cech across two days in mid-November, culminating in his keynote presentation through one of Hope’s newest endowed lectureships. Dr. Cech, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1989, is director of the BioFrontiers Institute and a Distinguished Professor in the Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Department at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He was on campus through the sponsorship of two lecture series: the Gentile Interdisciplinary Brothers Dr. Harrison C. Visscher ’51 and Dr. robert D. Visscher ’51, pictured with visiting speaker Dr. Thomas r. Cech (center), endowed a lectureship in genetics through the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign not only so that the campus community can learn from visiting leading scientists but to provide an opportunity for such scientists to experience first-hand the outstanding quality of Hope. Lecture Fund, which was created in 2005, and the new Dr. Harrison C. Visscher ’51 and Dr. Robert D. Visscher ’51 Lectureship in Genetics, established this year through the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign. The addresses he delivered through the two series—the first focused on interdisciplinary research and education, and the second centered on his research —were the most visible components of his time on campus, but the spaces in between embodied the deeper value of such visits and why the campaign is seeking to make more of them possible. Hope is intentional about providing myriad opportunities for interaction between visiting speakers and students and faculty, from informal meetings to gatherings at lunch and dinner, because experience has shown that those encounters often have significant impact. “When we bring a world-renowned scholar to campus, we want to benefit fully from their presence, so we look for opportunities for students and faculty to connect, to engage with them in a more personal way,” said President John C. Knapp. “Our students not only enrich their understanding of their academic fields but forge connections with the larger scholarly community.” The lectureships established through A Greater Hope join a diverse cohort that includes both long tradition and newer pedigree, from the James W. and Jeanette Neckers Lectureship in Chemistry (1984), to the A.J. Muste Memorial Peace Lectureship (1985), to the Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine (circa 1997), to the Presidential Colloquium (September). In addition to Dr. Cech, nationally and internationally known speakers who visited campus this fall included Dr. Richard Carwardine, who is president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford and an expert on Abraham Lincoln; Dr. Evelyn Lincoln, a member of the Brown University faculty who is a scholar on Italian Renaissance prints, printmaking and book illustrations; Dr. James B. Maas, a leading authority and consultant on sleep and performance; and Dr. Mark Noll, a historian at the University of Notre Dame who is widely published on the The largest single fundraising effort in the college’s history, the $175 million A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign will benefit every student as it strengthens the college’s endowment, adds several new buildings, and supports immediate needs through the annual Hope Fund. For more information, and to explore supporting the college through the campaign, please visit Hope on-line at campaign.hope.edu or contact mary remenschneider, campaign director, at remenschneider@hope.edu or (616) 395-7775. 6 News News From From Hope Hope College College

Visiting Scholars Enrich Learning

An appreciative Hope community engaged with visiting Nobel Laureate Dr. Thomas R. Cech across two days in mid-November, culminating in his keynote presentation through one of Hope’s newest endowed lectureships.<br /> <br /> Dr. Cech, who won the Nobel Prize in chemistry in 1989, is director of the BioFrontiers Institute and a Distinguished Professor in the Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Department at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He was on campus through the sponsorship of two lecture series: the Gentile Interdisciplinary Lecture Fund, which was created in 2005, and the new Dr. Harrison C. Visscher ’51 and Dr. Robert D. Visscher ’51 Lectureship in Genetics, established this year through the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign.<br /> <br /> The addresses he delivered through the two series—the first focused on interdisciplinary research and education, and the second centered on his research —were the most visible components of his time on campus, but the spaces in between embodied the deeper value of such visits and why the campaign is seeking to make more of them possible. Hope is intentional about providing myriad opportunities for interaction between visiting speakers and students and faculty, from informal meetings to gatherings at lunch and dinner, because experience has shown that those encounters often have significant impact.<br /> <br /> “When we bring a world-renowned scholar to campus, we want to benefit fully from their presence, so we look for opportunities for students and faculty to connect, to engage with them in a more personal way,” said President John C. Knapp. “Our students not only enrich their understanding of their academic fields but forge connections with the larger scholarly community.”<br /> <br /> The lectureships established through A Greater Hope join a diverse cohort that includes both long tradition and newer pedigree, from the James W. and Jeanette Neckers Lectureship in Chemistry (1984), to the A.J. Muste Memorial Peace Lectureship (1985), to the Distinguished Lecture Series in Sports Medicine (circa 1997), to the Presidential Colloquium (September). In addition to Dr. Cech, nationally and internationally known speakers who visited campus this fall included Dr. Richard Carwardine, who is president of Corpus Christi College at the University of Oxford and an expert on Abraham Lincoln; Dr. Evelyn Lincoln, a member of the Brown University faculty who is a scholar on Italian Renaissance prints, printmaking and book illustrations; Dr. James B. Maas, a leading authority and consultant on sleep and performance; and Dr. Mark Noll, a historian at the University of Notre Dame who is widely published on the history and current state of Christianity in the United States.<br /> <br /> Junior history major Claire Barrett of Ann Arbor, Mich., appreciated the opportunity to meet with Dr. Carwardine during a lunch with students that was part of his visit as the premiere speaker through the Presidential Colloquium, which also included informal talks on Corpus Christi’s role in the development of the King James Bible and Lincoln’s impact globally, as well as a formal lecture on Lincoln and leadership. “I liked having the one-on-one experience and the opportunity to hear his ideas more in-depth and ask questions about them,” she said.<br /> <br /> Senior Ben Foss of Northfield, Minn., an international studies and political science major, likewise valued the chance to participate in discussion that included not only Dr. Carwardine but also President Knapp and Dr. Fred Johnson of the Hope history faculty.<br /> <br /> “I thought it was an excellent idea to put students in a room with such brilliant minds as Dr. Johnson, President Knapp and Dr. Carwardine,” Foss said. “The benefit to the student goes beyond the academic facts because these men are great examples for us as emerging adults.”<br /> <br /> That sort of impact is central to planning for the World Christian Lecture Series, which like the Visscher lectureship was established through A Greater Hope. “We work hard to identify speakers whose faith is going to inspire our students to be more faithful as students, as Christians and as people in the world,” said Dr. Trygve Johnson, who is the Hinga-Boersma Dean of the Chapel and coordinates the series.<br /> <br /> Meaningful engagement is also at the heart of the new Dr. and Mrs. Norman ’53 and Marcia Veldman ’56 Thompson Lecture Series, which emphasizes connecting students with researchers in the medical or health fields, first meeting at Hope and subsequently through a visit to the speaker’s home institution, so that the students can gain a deeper understanding of the sorts of careers for which their Hope experiences are preparing them. The series debuted in October with the Thompsons’ son, himself a Hope alumnus: Dr. Robert Thompson ’79, an internationally known researcher who is director of the Washington University Center for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome and a professor of surgery at the Washington University Medical School.<br /> <br /> Just as Hope seeks to have a lasting impact on students through engagement with visiting speakers, the lectureships at their best can also have a lasting impact on Hope. For example, the Darell and Mary Schregardus Diversity Lecture, established through the campaign as part of the Phelps Scholars Program, has led to an ongoing relationship that even includes one of the college’s newest off-campus courses. The “Hope Comes to Watts” education May Term in Los Angeles, Calif., which started this past spring, developed through conversations that began when Gene and Sandra Fisher, founders of the Watts Learning Center, spoke through the series in January 2012.<br /> <br /> Such outcomes require that the guests have a good experience, but the Hope community makes that easy.<br /> <br /> “I hear again and again from those we have brought as lecturers how blessed, encouraged and inspired they are by our students,” Dr. Johnson said.<br /> <br /> It is also crucial that the speakers wish to visit in the first place.<br /> <br /> “That Hope College with regularity attracts world-class thinkers to the campus speaks well of Hope and its reputation as a place of serious scholarship,” President Knapp said. “People of this caliber, people like Nobel Laureates or the president of one of the most prestigious colleges in the world at Oxford, are willing to share their knowledge with us because Hope College is known as a place where ideas are valued and where thought leaders can engage with faculty and students who are eager to learn from them and with them.”

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