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Hope College October 2013 : Page 2

NEwS FrOm HOpE COLLEGE Volume 45, No. 2 October 2013 On the Cover The pageantry of the Presidential Inauguration is captured in this view of Dimnent Memorial Chapel as President John C. Knapp, in red at center back, processes en route to his formal installation as the college’s 12th president on Friday, Oct. 4. Dimnent has hosted the milestone ceremony for more than half of the college’s history, since President Wynand Wichers of the Class of 1909 was inaugurated in 1931. Students gather in the back yard of the president’s Home through one of multiple open invitations from John and Kelly Knapp this semester. Volume 45, No. 2 October 2013 Published for Alumni, Friends and Parents of Hope College by the Office of Public and Community Relations. Should you receive more than one copy, please pass it on to someone in your community. An overlap of Hope College constituencies makes duplication sometimes unavoidable. Editor Gregory S. Olgers ’87 Layout and Design Wesley A. Wooley ’89 Printing Walsworth Print Group of St. Joseph, Mich. Contributing Writers Greg Chandler, Myron Kukla, Chris Lewis ’09, Christina Van Eyl-Godin ’82 Contributing Photographers Rob Kurtycz, Lou Schakel ’71 Hope College Office of Public Relations DeWitt Center, Holland, MI 49423-3698 phone: (616) 395-7860 fax: (616) 395-7991 prelations@hope.edu Thomas L. Renner ’67 Associate Vice President for Public and Community Relations Gregory S. Olgers ’87 Director of News Media Services Lynne M. Powe ’86 Associate Director of Public and Community Relations Julie Rawlings ’83 Huisingh Public Relations Services Administrator Karen Bos Office Manager News from Hope College is published during April, June , August, October, and December by Hope College, 141 East 12th Street, Holla nd, Michigan 49423-3698 Postmaster: Send address changes to News from Hope College, Holland, MI 49423-3698 Notice of Nondiscrimination Hope College is commit ted to th e concept of equal rights, equal opportunities and equal protection under the law. Hope College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, creed or disability to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at Hope College, including the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, and athletic and other school-administered programs. With regard to employment, the College complies with all legal requirements prohibiting discrimination in employment . “Quote, unquote” Q uote, unquote is an eclectic sampling of things said at and about Hope College. As Hope launched its 152nd academic year with the entire incoming Class of 2017 gathered for the Opening Convocation on Sunday, Aug. 25, speaker President John C. Knapp found an apt and multi-layered analogy in the many trees that have enriched the campus since the college’s earliest days. President Knapp noted that Hope’s first president, Philip Phelps, had even had the idea of using an image of a tree as an expression of the mission of the college. “The tree, as he conceived it, grew many branches of learning as its roots deepened in the soil of the Christian faith,” President Knapp said. A recent survey of the campus, he said, chronicled 200 different trees representing some 40 species, which he noted was an appropriate symbol on other levels. “I think anyone would agree that our wooded campus is much more attractive because of our diversity of trees with their natural beauty in so many sizes and shapes,” President Knapp said. “The same may be said of your freshman class. God made each of you a unique individual. Together you make our life on campus more beautiful.” “Now there is a tree that we will not find on our campus. The giant Sequoia is the tallest tree in the world and can grow to heights of well over 300 feet. Yet you will never see a lone Sequoia towering over a forest. The surprising fact is that it has shallow roots that reach out to embrace and support the roots of other Sequoias. Like us, it can stand tall only in the company of others who support its growth.” President Knapp titled his address “Life Together,” echoing the title of a book by German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer which considers the nature of Christian community. President Knapp explored Hope as “a community of learners, a people who learn together, and often from each other, students and faculty alike.” As they conduct their journey at Hope, President Knapp said, the students could count on a faculty and staff committed to providing them the best. At the same time, he noted, what to make of the journey will be up to the students. “You will find that you have more choices and more autonomy to make your own decisions,” he said. “You will find that your learning depends more than ever before on your own ability to motivate yourself. You will find that with more freedom comes more responsibility for deciding how, where and with whom to spend your time.” Amid the many opportunities to interact and learn with others and engage in the life of the college, President Knapp noted that the students would also do well to find time to reflect on their experience. Referencing Bonhoeffer’s book, he noted, “He speaks of the importance of community, of shared work and worship. He describes a close-knit, mutually supportive group of learners. But he follows this with a very important lesson: It is also good and necessary at times to be alone for personal reflection, contemplation, meditation and prayer.” Even as they are shaped by Hope, the students, President Knapp said, will also shape the experience themselves, through how they choose to learn in community together. “Commit yourselves to building genuine friendships with everyone you meet, especially those whose places of birth, or race, or ethnicity or life experiences might be different from your own,” he said. “In so doing, you will be better, Hope College will be better, and in the long run the world will be better.” Editor’s Note: The entire address is available online. hope.edu/nfhc 2 News From Hope College

“Quote, unquote”

Quote, unquote is an eclectic sampling of things said at and about Hope College.<br /> <br /> As Hope launched its 152nd academic year with the entire incoming Class of 2017 gathered for the Opening Convocation on Sunday, Aug. 25, speaker President John C. Knapp found an apt and multi-layered analogy in the many trees that have enriched the campus since the college’s earliest days.<br /> <br /> President Knapp noted that Hope’s first president, Philip Phelps, had even had the idea of using an image of a tree as an expression of the mission of the college. “The tree, as he conceived it, grew many branches of learning as its roots deepened in the soil of the Christian faith,” President Knapp said.<br /> <br /> A recent survey of the campus, he said, chronicled 200 different trees representing some 40 species, which he noted was an appropriate symbol on other levels.<br /> <br /> “I think anyone would agree that our wooded campus is much more attractive because of our diversity of trees with their natural beauty in so many sizes and shapes,” President Knapp said. “The same may be said of your freshman class. God made each of you a unique individual. Together you make our life on campus more beautiful.”<br /> <br /> “Now there is a tree that we will not find on our campus. The giant Sequoia is the tallest tree in the world and can grow to heights of well over 300 feet. Yet you will never see a lone Sequoia towering over a forest. The surprising fact is that it has shallow roots that reach out to embrace and support the roots of other Sequoias. Like us, it can stand tall only in the company of others who support its growth.”<br /> <br /> President Knapp titled his address “Life Together,” echoing the title of a book by German theologian Dietrich Bonhoeffer which considers the nature of Christian community. President Knapp explored Hope as “a community of learners, a people who learn together, and often from each other, students and faculty alike.”<br /> <br /> As they conduct their journey at Hope, President Knapp said, the students could count on a faculty and staff committed to providing them the best. At the same time, he noted, what to make of the journey will be up to the students.<br /> <br /> “You will find that you have more choices and more autonomy to make your own decisions,” he said. “You will find that your learning depends more than ever before on your own ability to motivate yourself. You will find that with more freedom comes more responsibility for deciding how, where and with whom to spend your time.”<br /> <br /> Amid the many opportunities to interact and learn with others and engage in the life of the college, President Knapp noted that the students would also do well to find time to reflect on their experience. Referencing Bonhoeffer’s book, he noted, “He speaks of the importance of community, of shared work and worship. He describes a close-knit, mutually supportive group of learners. But he follows this with a very important lesson: It is also good and necessary at times to be alone for personal reflection, contemplation, meditation and prayer.”<br /> <br /> Even as they are shaped by Hope, the students, President Knapp said, will also shape the experience themselves, through how they choose to learn in community together.<br /> <br /> “Commit yourselves to building genuine friendships with everyone you meet, especially those whose places of birth, or race, or ethnicity or life experiences might be different from your own,” he said. “In so doing, you will be better, Hope College will be better, and in the long run the world will be better.”<br /> <br /> Editor’s Note: The entire address is available online. hope.edu/nfhc

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