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Hope College August 2013 : Page 16

Staff Profile Every Day an By Greg Chandler Adventure Andel Soccer Stadium, Boeve Stadium (baseball) and Wolters Stadium (softball). “All the facilities we build at Hope are for our students—the academic facilities, the residential facilities, the athletic facilities—and are meant to enhance a student’s experience,” said Maybury, who came to Hope in 1990 as the college’s director of computing and information technology. Early on, Maybury developed a three-year plan for accelerating the implementation of computer technology. Under his leadership, the process was completed in half the time. In 1994, Maybury was approached about taking over as Hope’s director of operations, based on his success with expanding the college’s use of technology. Even though his background wasn’t in facilities—his first job was as a math teacher at the prestigious Choate Rosemary Hall prep school in Connecticut—he took on the challenge. “It was on-the-job training,” Maybury said. “Luckily, they started me slow and allowed me to grow into the position.” Maybury’s first projects included construction of the DeWitt Tennis Center and a $1 million renovation and expansion of the DeWitt theatre. But college officials had a vision of the future, and Maybury would play a central role in implementing that vision. The college was looking to expand, with new facilities for academics and athletics. However, there were limitations on where Hope could expand. “The college knew it was bound on the north by the downtown, which is a great location,” Maybury said. “We were bound on the west by Centennial Park. We had residential areas to the south, and we didn’t want to go too far south. So our only growth area would be to the east.” The college shared its vision with Holland city leaders, and found a willing partner, and the two entities worked on a number of property acquisitions and land exchanges. The expansion started with construction of the Martha Miller Center, on the site of a former Holland elementary school, and DeVos Fieldhouse in 2005, on property that included numerous private residences as well as a foundry and the city street department. “Greg has been instrumental in working through complex and often consuming property I t’s early on a Tuesday morning on the Hope campus, and Greg Maybury is meeting with a contractor who is working on refinishing the surface of the concrete in the concourse areas of DeVos Fieldhouse. It’s just the start of a busy day for Maybury, Hope’s director of operations and chief sustainability officer. Before the end of the day, Maybury will visit the Tom and Ryan Cook Village, a 60-bed student residential community located just south of DeVos, check on completion of the new “Eastern Gateway” sign welcoming Holland visitors to the city and to the Hope campus, and hold a conference call with contractors on the Kruizenga Art Museum, for which site work is underway near the DePree Art Center. “Overseeing the departmental operations is a full-time job by itself,” said Thomas Bylsma ’86, Hope’s vice president of business and finance. “Greg’s ability to also successfully coordinate and manage numerous campus building projects in various stages of work at the same time is remarkable.” There’s no such thing as a typical “day at the office” for Maybury, who has overseen the largest expansion of campus facilities in Hope’s history over the past two decades. Since taking over his current role in 1995, the campus has grown from 90 acres to 150 acres, with its building footprint in that same span growing from 1.25 million square feet to 1.77 million square feet. Maybury has been a leader on projects ranging from the construction of the Haworth Inn and Conference Center (1997) to the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication (2005) to Hope’s sprawling athletic complex that includes DeVos, Van There’s no such thing as a typical “day at the office” for Greg Maybury, director of operations and chief sustainability officer, who has overseen the largest expansion of campus facilities in Hope’s history over the past two decades. 16 News News From From Hope Hope College College

Staff Profile

Greg Chandler

<br /> Every Day an Adventure<br /> <br /> It’s early on a Tuesday morning on the Hope campus, and Greg Maybury is meeting with a contractor who is working on refinishing the surface of the concrete in the concourse areas of DeVos Fieldhouse.<br /> <br /> It’s just the start of a busy day for Maybury, Hope’s director of operations and chief sustainability officer.<br /> <br /> Before the end of the day, Maybury will visit the Tom and Ryan Cook Village, a 60-bed student residential community located just south of DeVos, check on completion of the new “Eastern Gateway” sign welcoming Holland visitors to the city and to the Hope campus, and hold a conference call with contractors on the Kruizenga Art Museum, for which site work is underway near the DePree Art Center.<br /> <br /> “Overseeing the departmental operations is a full-time job by itself,” said Thomas Bylsma ’86, Hope’s vice president of business and finance. “Greg’s ability to also successfully coordinate and manage numerous campus building projects in various stages of work at the same time is remarkable.”<br /> <br /> There’s no such thing as a typical “day at the office” for Maybury, who has overseen the largest expansion of campus facilities in Hope’s history over the past two decades. Since taking over his current role in 1995, the campus has grown from 90 acres to 150 acres, with its building footprint in that same span growing from 1.25 million square feet to 1.77 million square feet.<br /> <br /> Maybury has been a leader on projects ranging from the construction of the Haworth Inn and Conference Center (1997) to the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication (2005) to Hope’s sprawling athletic complex that includes DeVos, Van Andel Soccer Stadium, Boeve Stadium (baseball) and Wolters Stadium (softball).<br /> <br /> “All the facilities we build at Hope are for our students—the academic facilities, the residential facilities, the athletic facilities—and are meant to enhance a student’s experience,” said Maybury, who came to Hope in 1990 as the college’s director of computing and information technology.<br /> <br /> Early on, Maybury developed a three-year plan for accelerating the implementation of computer technology. Under his leadership, the process was completed in half the time.<br /> <br /> In 1994, Maybury was approached about taking over as Hope’s director of operations, based on his success with expanding the college’s use of technology. Even though his background wasn’t in facilities—his first job was as a math teacher at the prestigious Choate Rosemary Hall prep school in Connecticut—he took on the challenge.<br /> <br /> “It was on-the-job training,” Maybury said. “Luckily, they started me slow and allowed me to grow into the position.”<br /> <br /> Maybury’s first projects included construction of the DeWitt Tennis Center and a $1 million renovation and expansion of the DeWitt theatre. But college officials had a vision of the future, and Maybury would play a central role in implementing that vision.<br /> <br /> The college was looking to expand, with new facilities for academics and athletics. However, there were limitations on where Hope could expand.<br /> <br /> “The college knew it was bound on the north by the downtown, which is a great location,” Maybury said. “We were bound on the west by Centennial Park. We had residential areas to the south, and we didn’t want to go too far south. So our only growth area would be to the east.”<br /> <br /> The college shared its vision with Holland city leaders, and found a willing partner, and the two entities worked on a number of property acquisitions and land exchanges. The expansion started with construction of the Martha Miller Center, on the site of a former Holland elementary school, and DeVos Fieldhouse in 2005, on property that included numerous private residences as well as a foundry and the city street department.<br /> <br /> “Greg has been instrumental in working through complex and often consuming property exchanges that resulted not only in significant benefit to Hope College but also to the many diverse opportunities provided to the community to share in the use of new and enhanced facilities and to enjoy the product of student and faculty endeavors offered through those same campus facilities,” said Phil Meyer, the city’s director of neighborhood services.<br /> <br /> “I believe Greg is very aware of and comfortable with the notion that what is good for Hope College can and should be good for the community, and what is good for the community can and should be good for Hope College.”<br /> <br /> In 2007, the college completed construction on the Boeve and Wolters stadiums, at a cost of $1.6 million. Two years later, Maybury oversaw completion of the $5.7 million construction and renovation of Graves Hall, Hope’s second-oldest building. The restoration returned the building back to its original floor plan with extensive repairs to the exterior stonework. The 1,400-seat Van Andel Soccer Stadium was also finished in 2009, stamping it immediately as one of the top Division III soccer facilities in the country.<br /> <br /> Last year, the Vande Poel-Herringa Stadium Courts outdoor tennis facility was finished, adjacent to the DeWitt Tennis Center. This summer marked the completion of the Cook Village and the $3 million Haworth Engineering addition – a 9,000-square-foot addition to VanderWerf Hall to house Hope’s growing engineering program.<br /> <br /> Charles Geenen, president of GDK Construction, a Holland, Mich.-based construction company that has been the general contractor for several of Hope’s expansion projects, including the Van Andel Soccer Stadium and the engineering addition at VanderWerf, values Maybury’s involvement in every aspect of the project, from the vision through the bidding process to following up on project details.<br /> <br /> “Greg is a great idea guy. He works with a large team of people very well and is able to lead a group to come up with an excellent facility,” Geenen said. “He is always available. He responds quickly to questions with answers. That really helps us keep the project moving on a timely basis.”<br /> <br /> As work concludes on several projects on the Hope campus, others are just getting started— such as the Jack H. Miller Center for Musical Arts, which is slated to begin before the end of the year, as well as the Jim and Martie Bultman Student Center, which is scheduled to break ground after the music center replaces Nykerk Hall. Already, Maybury is incorporating the input of Hope students in the planning of the Bultman Center.<br /> <br /> “It’s going to be their space. We’ve a needed a student space for as long as I’ve been at Hope,” he said.<br /> <br /> In addition to overseeing the various construction projects over the years, Maybury also oversees the college’s physical plant, transportation department and campus safety department. He also coordinates recycling and energy-efficiency programs as chief sustainability officer.<br /> <br /> In the community, Maybury has served on a number of local boards and commissions. He is a past chairman of the Holland Hospital board of directors, a past president of Hospice of Holland’s board of directors and represents the college as part of an ongoing downtown strategic planning process.<br /> <br /> Away from campus, Maybury can be seen riding or restoring motorcycles. On a wall in his office is a picture of a 1980 Honda CBX he restored with his youngest son, Kevin ’14. “I found it in a shed,” he said.<br /> <br /> Indeed, the life of the entire Maybury family is entwined with the Hope campus. His wife, Kate, is a training specialist for the Computing and Information Technology Department. Two of his sons, Christopher ’08 and Kyle ’10, have graduated from the college, while Kevin will be a senior this fall.<br /> <br /> Bylsma says outside of the president’s position, Maybury has had greatest impact on the footprint and look of Hope’s campus over the past 20 years.<br /> <br /> “It’s not a stretch to say that in the entire history of the college, Greg has played one of the most significant roles in shaping t he Hope campus,” Bylsma said. “Greg’s work will be enjoyed by students, faculty, staff and visitors for many generations to come.”<br /> <br /> There’s no such thing as a typical “day at the office” for Greg Maybury, director of operations and chief sustainability officer, who has overseen the largest expansion of campus facilities in Hope’s history over the past two decades.

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