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Hope College August 2013 : Page 14

Campus Profile “We Hide the Learning in the Fun” camp for two summers. “I was in charge of the curriculum, planning, preparing, and teaching for each class period, the same as I do now with my own classroom,” Folkert said. “It gave me the confidence that I could actually do this and gave me some experience I could carry with me into job interviews and, eventually, into my first teaching position.” “Tod knew how to pick good teachers for the camps, people who are self-starters and who would have fun with the campers,” said Brenda Gugino, who has been involved with the program since the beginning, giving administrative structure to her husband’s unbounded creativity. Until recently, she and Tod worked side by side to implement the camp, but that changed when Tod was diagnosed with health issues in late 2011. Dr. Michael Seymour, a chemistry faculty member since 1978, joined the team in planning for this summer’s camps, and since Tod’s death in April, he has worked with Brenda to continue the program that is Tod’s legacy. Dr. Seymour had been tangentially involved with the camps from the beginning, helping Tod to develop a program that included activities Dr. Seymour had used when he participated in the Hope Kellogg Partners in Science Program from 1989 to 1992. “Tod had the interest to engage young students, and I had gathered a By Christina VanEyl-Godin ’82 “L et me show you something, Elyse.” It was the second day of science camp, and five-year-old Elyse Kedzie was still sticking close to her mother. But when camp director Tod Gugino ’85 led her to the lab, her anxiety melted, and her love of science began to take off. Hope College Science Camps provided Elyse with education and recreation for many summers, when her family traveled from Alamo, Calif., to spend their days on Lake Michigan near Holland’s Ottawa Beach. She attended The variety of themes and mix of activities featured each summer (like the ship-building pictured from “Pirates Cove,” above, or the robot-building challenge of “Lego II,” at top center) are designed with a range of age levels and interests in mind. a few sports camps as well, and spent three summers volunteering with Hope’s CASA program. Now a high school graduate who considered attending Hope, she opted for a school closer to home. That shy five-year-old is on her way to USC this fall with her eye on a degree in chemical engineering. Hope’s Science Camps are now in their 15th year. Gugino, director of chemistry laboratories at Hope, launched the camps in 1998 with offerings in chemistry and biology targeted at elementary school kids. This year the camp enrollment of 740 ranged in age from prekindergarten through eighth grade. Many are returning campers, and some are taking more than one of the 34 week-long offerings that focus on topics including dissection, video game making, and Club Vet. The selections change some from year to year to keep up with both science and culture. Legos, CSI courses, and camps based on Disney Channel stars Phineas and Ferb are current favorites. During presidential election years, there is an offering on political science. And there is always talk about how to expand the camps into other disciplines. Many of the camps’ most successful ideas, however, have remained constant from the beginning. Case in point: the opportunity for Hope’s science and education students to serve as camp instructors allows the college students to gain valuable experience while honing their teaching skills. Jason Folkert ‘09, now a chemistry teacher at Holland Christian High School, taught at the 14 News News From From Hope Hope College College

“We Hide the Learning in the Fun”

Christina VanEyl-Godin

<br /> “Let me show you something, Elyse.”<br /> <br /> It was the second day of science camp, and five-year-old Elyse Kedzie was still sticking close to her mother. But when camp director Tod Gugino ’85 led her to the lab, her anxiety melted, and her love of science began to take off.<br /> <br /> Hope College Science Camps provided Elyse with education and recreation for many summers, when her family traveled from Alamo, Calif., to spend their days on Lake Michigan near Holland’s Ottawa Beach. She attended a few sports camps as well, and spent three summers volunteering with Hope’s CASA program. Now a high school graduate who considered attending Hope, she opted for a school closer to home. That shy five-year-old is on her way to USC this fall with her eye on a degree in chemical engineering.<br /> <br /> Hope’s Science Camps are now in their 15th year. Gugino, director of chemistry laboratories at Hope, launched the camps in 1998 with offerings in chemistry and biology targeted at elementary school kids. This year the camp enrollment of 740 ranged in age from prekindergarten through eighth grade. Many are returning campers, and some are taking more than one of the 34 week-long offerings that focus on topics including dissection, video game making, and Club Vet.<br /> <br /> The selections change some from year to year to keep up with both science and culture. Legos, CSI courses, and camps based on Disney Channel stars Phineas and Ferb are current favorites. During presidential election years, there is an of fering on political science. And there is always talk about how to expand the camps into other disciplines.<br /> <br /> Many of the camps’ most successful ideas, however, have remained constant from the beginning. Case in point: the opportunity for Hope’s science and education students to serve as camp instructors allows the college students to gain valuable experience while honing their teaching skills.<br /> <br /> Jason Folkert ‘09, now a chemistry teacher at Holland Christian High School, taught at the camp for two summers. “I was in charge of the curriculum, planning, preparing, and teaching for each class period, the same as I do now with my own classroom,” Folkert said. “It gave me the confidence that I could actually do this and gave me some experience I could carry with me into job interviews and, eventually, into my first teaching position.”<br /> <br /> “Tod knew how to pick good teachers for the camps, people who are self-starters and who would have fun with the campers,” said Brenda Gugino, who has been involved with the program since the beginning, giving administrative structure to her husband’s unbounded creativity.<br /> <br /> Until recently, she and Tod worked side by side to implement the camp, but that changed when Tod was diagnosed with health issues in late 2011. Dr. Michael Seymour, a chemistry faculty member since 1978, joined the team in planning for this summer’s camps, and since Tod’s death in April, he has worked with Brenda to continue the program that is Tod’s legacy.<br /> <br /> Dr. Seymour had been tangentially involved with the camps from the beginning, helping Tod to develop a program that included activities Dr. Seymour had used when he participated in the Hope Kellogg Partners in Science Program from 1989 to 1992. “Tod had the interest to engage young students, and I had gathered a lot of resources while working with elementary teachers in the Kellogg Program, as well having been a workshop presenter for the Institute of Chemical Education program,” Dr. Seymour said. Dr. Seymour watched the camp grow and develop over the years, and stepped in as the resident “science guy” when Tod’s health issues became more serious.<br /> <br /> Camp alum Sarah Schuiling ’15 of Zeeland, Mich., is now not only a Hope student but also a camp teacher. “I remember attending science camps and Mr. Gugino working with flubber and liquid nitrogen,” she said. “Coming into Hope College I thought I would become a dentist. My future plans are to go into speech pathology within a school system. Science camps have showed me how much I desire to build relationships in a career and particularly work with young children.”<br /> <br /> Brenda Gugino and Dr. Seymour see the camps as successful on many levels. The camps bring both kids and their parents and grandparents t o campus, where t hey be come acquainted with Hope and all that it offers, and where children learn that college is desirable and attainable. Hope’s students get valuable teaching experience and opportunities to develop leadership skills and teamwork.<br /> <br /> Sometimes the experience has changed a person’s life. Quinette Yarbrough ’10 of Louisville, Ky., planned to earn a degree in nursing when she began at Hope as a 21-year-old single mother. “I never wanted to be a teacher,” she said. “The thought had never even crossed my mind until I had a lab with Tod. I struggled miserably through his lab and spent a lot of hours after class just trying to make it through. One day Tod told me, ‘You’re a teacher at heart! Come teach for me this summer in the Summer Science Camps.’ After my first summer working in the camps, I was in love. I enrolled in some education classes that fall to see if it was something I could be interested in. Soon after, I applied for and was accepted into the Hope education program.” Yarbrough has been teaching first grade in Louisville since she graduated.<br /> <br /> Amanda Schuiling ’13 of Zeeland is enrolled in grad school this fall, pursuing a master’s in biostatistics, but spent the summer teaching. “I find it enjoyable passing on my knowledge and love of science with kids who may study science in the future,” she said.<br /> <br /> In the end, “Tod would say that it’s all about the campers,” Brenda said. She loves walking by lab classrooms designed to hold adult-sized students and seeing them filled with kids whose feet don’t touch the floor but whose curiosity is fully engaged. She loves a science building filled with children, and she delights in talking about the last day of the Princess Science Camp, when the youngest scientists, having studied gems, color, and textiles, show up in full royal regalia, and how excited the girls are when a teacher follows suit. “With science camp, we hide the learning in the fun,” she said.<br /> <br /> “Camp does a great job of teaching with a student-centered approach,” Folkert said. “Teaching in the science camps helped me realize that students learn so much more when they are engaged with what they are learning and exploring topics of interest to them. In the Lego Robotics camp, as teachers we had a ‘challenge’ we wanted the students to complete. But the students always had other ideas that they wanted to do and honestly, their ideas were usually better and more complex than ours. Camps taught me that students always have the potential to exceed our expectations, we just need to give them the opportunity to do so.”<br /> <br /> Elyse Kedzie’s mother, Cathy Krueger ’77 Kedzie, would agree. “The Hope Science Camps exposed Elyse to fun experiments and learning in an academic setting. They presented material in detail, not dumbed-down,” she said. She still has some of the projects her daughter accomplished while in camp, including dendrites made from seashells and a clothespin flashlight.<br /> <br /> “We want the campers to have fun and learn,” Brenda said. “Tod called them his ‘little buddies.’ He loved Hope, and he loved kids. He’d be so proud that we’re able to keep it going this year.”<br /> <br /> The camps bring both kids and their parents and grandparents to campus, where they become acquainted with Hope and all that it offers, and where children learn that college is desirable and attainable. Hope’s students get valuable teaching experience and opportunities to develop leadership skills and teamwork.

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