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Hope College June 2013 : Page 6

A Greater Hope Building A Greater Hope Together A James E. Bultman ’63, and no one could be more delighted that they have grown so dramatically. “I have always said publically that the most cherished gift of all is one that provides scholarship money for talented and deserving students, and I still feel that way,” he said. Members of the Hope family have been establishing scholarships to provide financial aid for students for generations, but a fair percentage of the growth is attributable to A Greater Hope , with more than 100 established since the comprehensive campaign began its “quiet phase” some years ago. “That’s a significant achievement that will have a long-term effect for students at Hope,” President Bultman said. The same dynamic is writ across the $175 million campaign, with A Greater Hope having a lasting impact by building on and strengthening what came before. It’s part of an upward trajectory that has President Bultman optimistic for the college’s future as he enters the closing weeks of his 14-year presidency—and as he reflects on more than 50 years of association with Hope. “I’ve known Hope since the late ’50s as a student, and I don’t think I’ve ever seen Hope as strong academically, spiritually and financially as it is today,” he said. “That is a very good feeling.” The strength, he notes, reflects the dedication of thousands who have worked and given on the college’s behalf since Hope’s earliest days. “It’s not a single person—it’s a team of people working together,” he said. “And it’s not just the people here now, but building on the groundwork established by earlier generations.” “This is the way it’s supposed to be,” he said. “You’re supposed to be stronger academically, you’re supposed to be stronger couple decades ago or so, the college’s endowed-scholarship luncheon was an annual event that fit neatly into the Maas Center auditorium. Today, Hope organizes luncheons plural, one each semester, that have long since relocated to the significantly larger main ballroom of the Haworth Inn and Conference Center. They are filled to capacity. The gatherings provide an opportunity for the scholarships’ sponsors and the students who benefit from the aid to spend time together, with students given a chance to understand how others with generous hearts have made a priority of their future, and for sponsors to meet the outstanding young people whose lives are being changed because of their support. Bringing together as they do two groups that are important to each other and to Hope, the luncheons are a particular favorite of President “I’ve known Hope since the late ’50s as a student, and I don’t think I’ve ever see Hope as strong academically, spiritually and financially as it is today. That is a very good feeling.” – President James E. Bultman ’63 when it opens this fall, the 9,000-square-foot Haworth engineering Center will provide laboratory and research space for a program that has grown dramatically since it began offering a major in 1997. engineering is one of the top choices indicated by prospective students as they consider Hope. spiritually and you’re supposed to be stronger financially. I look at it not as a blip on the graph but the result of a series of wise decisions spread across the history of the college.” A Greater Hope is designed to make a lasting difference in each of those dimensions—and is already doing so as the campaign approaches its conclusion. In addition to the new scholarships, endowment support so far has added eight new endowed professorships and an endowed directorship; major program support for undergraduate research, spiritual life, multicultural education and international education; and a variety of faculty development funds, departmental funds and endowed lectureships. Among capital improvements, Hope had completed the Van Andel Soccer Stadium and Boeve and Wolters baseball and 6 News News From From Hope Hope College College

A Greater Hope

James E. Bultman

<br /> “I’ve known Hope since the late ’50s as a student, and I don’t think I’ve ever see Hope as strong academically, spiritually and financially as it is today. That is a very good feeling.”<br /> <br /> A couple decades ago or s o, the college’s endowed-scholarship luncheon was an annual event that fit neatly into the Maas Center auditorium.<br /> <br /> Today, Hope organizes luncheons plural, one each semester, that have long since relocated to the significantly larger main ballroom of the Haworth Inn and Conference Center. They are filled to capacity.<br /> <br /> The gatherings provide an opportunity for the scholarships’ sponsors and the students who benefit from the aid to spend time together, with students given a chance to understand how others with generous hearts have made a priority of their future, and for sponsors to meet the outstanding young people whose lives are being changed because of their support. Bringing together as they do two groups that are important to each other and to Hope, the luncheons are a particular favorite of President James E. Bultman ’63, and no one could be more delighted that they have grown so dramatically.<br /> <br /> “I have always said publically that the most cherished gift of all is one that provides scholarship money for talented and deserving students, and I still feel that way,” he said.<br /> <br /> Members of the Hope family have been establishing scholarships to provide financial aid for students for generations, but a fair percentage of the growth is attributable to A Greater Hope, with more than 100 established since the comprehensive campaign began its “quiet phase” some years ago. “That’s a significant achievement that will have a long-term effect for students at Hope,” President Bultman said.<br /> <br /> The same dynamic is writ across the $175 million campaign, with A Greater Hope having a lasting impact by building on and strengthening what came before. It’s part of an upward trajectory that has President Bultman optimistic for the college’s future as he enters the closing weeks of his 14-year presidency—and as he reflects on more than 50 years of association with Hope.<br /> <br /> “I’ve known Hope since the late ’50s as a student, and I don’t think I’ve ever seen Hope as strong academically, spiritually and financially as it is today,” he said. “T hat is a very good feeling.”<br /> <br /> The strength, he notes, reflects the dedication of thousands who have worked and given on the college’s behalf since Hope’s earliest days.<br /> <br /> “It’s not a single person—it’s a team of people working together,” he said. “And it’s not just the people here now, but building on the groundwork established by earlier generations.”<br /> <br /> “This is the way it’s supposed to be,” he said. “You’re supposed to be stronger academically, you’re supposed to be stronger spiritually and you’re supposed to be stronger financially. I look at it not as a blip on the graph but the result of a series of wise decisions spread across the history of the college.”<br /> <br /> A Greater Hope is designed to make a lasting difference in each of those dimensions—and is already doing so as t he campaign approaches its conclusion. In addition to the new scholarships, endowment support so far has added eight new endowed professorships and an endowed directorship; major program support for undergraduate research, spiritual life, multicultural education and international education; and a variety of faculty development funds, departmental funds and endowed lectureships. Among capital improvements, Hope had completed the Van Andel Soccer Stadium and Boeve and Wolters baseball and softball stadiums even before the public launch of the campaign in October 2011, completed the Vande Poel-Heeringa Stadium Courts at the Etheridge Tennis Complex in 2012, will finish the Haworth Engineering Center in time for the start of classes this fall, and in late May celebrated the groundbreaking for the Kruizenga Art Museum.<br /> <br /> As notable as the achievements are, much remains to be done, and President Bultman is hoping that more in the extended Hope family will make a commitment to supporting the campaign. Every gift, he noted, makes a difference.<br /> <br /> “I think we’ve been very successful in attracting what I would call large leadership gifts,” he said. “As we look ahead to the remainder of the campaign, successfully completing the initiatives is going to require a groundswell of support from our alumni and friends who we hope will contribute as they are able.”<br /> <br /> Additional support can benefit all the components of the campaign. The two major capital projects not yet underway because fundraising is ongoing are the concert hall and music facility and the student center to be named in honor of Jim and Martie Bultman. Although each has received significant support, Hope, as an expression of stewardship, is waiting to start construction until each is fully funded, to avoid adding debt that could hamper the college in the future. In the same way, Hope has even made a maintenance endowment part of each project’s funding goal so that caring for the structures in the future won’t be a financial burden.<br /> <br /> “For every new building, we’ve required 25 percent of the construction cost in endowment before it’s built so that future generations won’t be stuck with the cost of maintaining buildings that we build today,” President Bultman said. “It does delay construction of the building when you do it, but it’s been a good policy for Hope.”<br /> <br /> The campaign projects are running in tandem with other opportunities and initiatives. In 2012, for example, the college extensively renovated Holland Municipal Stadium (now named Ray and Sue Smith Stadium), which it had the opportunity to purchase from the City of Holland. Hope is also currently constructing the Tom and Ryan Cook Village, which will open in the fall as up-scale housing for 60 students.<br /> <br /> The growth of campus through A Greater Hope continues a process that has been given particular emphasis since the beginning of the millennium, with the college’s acreage trebling. “That’s significant for a college that was essentially landlocked,” President Bultman said. He noted that the physical growth has helped the college’s infrastructure develop to support the continuously high, and often record-high, enrollments of the past several years.<br /> <br /> Across his years at Hope, President Bultman has made a point of noting that the college constructs buildings and develops and operates programs not for their own sake, but to provide the facilities and resources that will best support Hope’s faculty, staff and students as they teach, mentor and learn. A Greater Hope, he noted, reflects that emphasis.<br /> <br /> “It’s the endowment part of it, it’s the buildings, it’s the land acquisition—these things will all help long-term,” he said.<br /> <br /> “Hope is distinctive in being exceptional academically and vibrantly Christian at the same time,” President Bultman said. “A Greater Hope is helping to ensure that the same transformative experience that Hope has provided for generations will continue for years to come.”

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