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Hope College June 2013 : Page 2

News FrOm HOpe COllege Volume 44, No. 5 June 2013 president James Bultman ’63 speaks during the groundbreaking ceremony for the A. paul schaap science Center in may 2002. significant enhancements of the campus during his 14 years as president have supported his goal of providing the college’s faculty and students with the facilities and resources they need to teach and learn at the highest levels. On the Cover President James E. Bultman congratulates Stefani Pentiuk ’13 during Commencement on Sunday, May 5, at Ray and Sue Smith Stadium. A nursing major, Pentiuk chose her career inspired by the outstanding care she received from nurses as a young heart-transplant patient at just eight years old. More about President Bultman, who is retiring, is on this page and page eight, and more about Pentiuk is on page 20. Volume 44, No. 5 June 2013 Published for Alumni, Friends and Parents of Hope College by the Office of Public and Community Relations. Should you receive more than one copy, please pass it on to someone in your community. An overlap of Hope College constituencies makes duplication sometimes unavoidable. Editor Gregory S. Olgers ’87 Layout and Design Wesley A. Wooley ’89 Printing Walsworth Print Group of St. Joseph, Mich. Contributing Writers Greg Chandler, Chris Lewis ’09, Christina Van Eyl-Godin ’82 Contributing Photographers Rob Kurtycz, Lou Schakel ’71 Hope College Office of Public Relations DeWitt Center, Holland, MI 49423-3698 phone: (616) 395-7860 fax: (616) 395-7991 prelations@hope.edu Thomas L. Renner ’67 Associate Vice President for Public and Community Relations Gregory S. Olgers ’87 Director of News Media Services Lynne M. Powe ’86 Associate Director of Public and Community Relations Julie Rawlings ’83 Huisingh Public Relations Services Administrator Karen Bos Office Manager News from Hope College is published during April, June , August, October, and December by Hope College, 141 East 12th Street, Holla nd, Michigan 49423-3698 Postmaster: Send address changes to News from Hope College, Holland, MI 49423-3698 Notice of Nondiscrimination Hope College is commit ted to th e concept of equal rights, equal opportunities and equal protection under the law. Hope College admits students of any race, color, national and ethnic origin, sex, creed or disability to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at Hope College, including the administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, and athletic and other school-administered programs. With regard to employment, the College complies with all legal requirements prohibiting discrimination in employment . Dedicated leadership, W hen he took office14 years ago, President James E. Bultman ’63 was committed to helping assure that Hope was both exceptional academically and vibrantly Christian, building on the strengths and traditions of the past in preparing the college for not only a new century but a new millennium. As he nears his June 30 retirement, Hope is thriving and well-positioned as a new era in the life of the college is about to begin. President Bultman’s passion for Hope stems from an appreciation for the college that began with his own experience as a student beginning in the fall of 1959. In addition to his tenure as president, he has served his alma mater as a faculty member, academic administrator and coach. He became Hope’s 11th president in 1999, after 14 years as president of Northwestern College. Hope has enjoyed distinction on a variety of external measures during his presidency, including multiple national recognitions of and major grant support for the college’s emphasis on collaborative faculty-student research, and national accreditation in all four arts programs. A Lilly-funded “Program for the Theological Exploration of Vocation” established in the fall of 2003 expanded the college’s emphasis on encouraging students to consider the role of calling in their life and career choices. In 2011, Hope was one of only 115 colleges and universities across the country named to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s “2010 Community Engagement Classification,” a reflection of the college’s institution-wide emphasis on service and service-learning. The past 14 years have also been a period of steady growth in enrollment, from 2,943 students in 1999 to more than 3,200 students each year since 2006, including a record enrollment of 3,343 during the past school year. During his tenure, Hope has pursued the two largest single fund-raising efforts in the college’s history. The college launched the Legacies: A Vision of Hope comprehensive campaign during his second year as president. The campaign’s four major A Greater Hope components included construction of the A. Paul Schaap Science Center and renovation of the Peale Science Center; construction of the Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse; increasing the endowment; and general campus improvements, including the construction of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication, a restoration of historic Graves Hall and a renovation of Lubbers Hall. When it concluded at the end of 2001, Hope had raised more than $161 million from more than 3,300 donors, well above the goal of $105 million. Hope launched its current A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign in October 2011. The $175 million effort is benefiting every student as it strengthens the endowment, adds several new buildings, and supports immediate needs through the annual Hope Fund. The endowment portion of the campaign includes support for student scholarships, faculty-student collaborative research, outstanding faculty, and initiatives in international and multicultural education and spiritual life. Facilities completed include the Van Andel Soccer Stadium, Boeve Baseball Stadium, Wolters Softball Stadium and outdoor VandePoel-Heeringa Stadium Courts in tennis. The Haworth Engineering Center will be completed this summer, and forthcoming major enhancements include the Kruizenga Art Museum, a concert hall and music building, and a new student center (in addition to the campaign, Hope is also building the Tom and Ryan Cook Village, which will be completed this summer). When the campaign concludes, Hope will have raised one third of a billion dollars during the economically depressed 2000s, built or renovated most campus buildings, trebled its land acreage and increased its endowment by 50 percent. President Bultman reflects on the importance and impact of A Greater Hope in the story on pages six-seven. Photo highlights from across his years in office are featured on pages eight-nine. A more detailed biographical sketch and links to other articles recently published in News from Hope College in commemoration of his presidency are available online. hope.edu/nfhc 2 News From Hope College

Dedicated Leadership, A Greater Hope

When he took office14 years ago, President James E. Bultman ’63 was committed to helping assure that Hope was both exceptional academically and vibrantly Christian, building on the strengths and traditions of the past in preparing the college for not only a new century but a new millennium. As he nears his June 30 retirement, Hope is thriving and well-positioned as a new era in the life of the college is about to begin.<br /> <br /> President Bultman’s passion for Hope stems from an appreciation for the college that began with his own experience as a student beginning in the fall of 1959. In addition to his tenure as president, he has served his alma mater as a faculty member, academic administrator and coach. He became Hope’s 11th president in 1999, after 14 years as president of Northwestern College.<br /> <br /> Hope has enjoyed distinction on a variety of external measures during his presidency, including multiple national recognitions of and major grant support for the college’s emphasis on collaborative faculty-student research, and national accreditation in all four arts programs. A Lilly-funded “Program for the Theological Exploration of Vocation” established in the fall of 2003 expanded the college’s emphasis on encouraging students to consider the role of calling in their life and career choices. In 2011, Hope was one of only 115 colleges and universities across the country named to the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s “2010 Community Engagement Classification,” a reflection of the college’s institution-wide emphasis on service and service-learning.<br /> <br /> The past 14 years have also been a period of steady growth in enrollment, from 2,943 students in 1999 to more than 3,200 students each year since 2006, including a record enrollment of 3,343 during the past school year.<br /> <br /> During his tenure, Hope has pursued the two largest single fund-raising efforts in the college’s history. The college launched the Legacies: A Vision of Hope comprehensive campaign during his second year as president. The campaign’s four major components included construction of the A. Paul Schaap Science Center and renovation of the Peale Science Center; construction of the Richard and Helen DeVos Fieldhouse; increasing the endowment; and general campus improvements, including the construction of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication, a restoration of historic Graves Hall and a renovation of Lubbers Hall. When it concluded at the end of 2001, Hope had raised more than $161 million from more than 3,300 donors, well above the goal of $105 million.<br /> <br /> Hope launched its current A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign in October 2011. The $175 million effort is benefiting every student as it strengthens the endowment, adds several new buildings, and supports immediate needs through the annual Hope Fund. The endowment portion of the campaign includes support for student scholarships, faculty-student collaborative research, outstanding faculty, and initiatives in international and multicultural education and spiritual life. Facilities completed include the Van Andel Soccer Stadium, Boeve Baseball Stadium, Wolters Softball Stadium and outdoor VandePoel-Heeringa Stadium Courts in tennis. The Haworth Engineering Center will be completed this summer, and forthcoming major enhancements include the Kruizenga Art Museum, a concert hall and music building, and a new student center (in addition to the campaign, Hope is also building the Tom and Ryan Cook Village, which will be completed this summer). When the campaign concludes, Hope will have raised one third of a billion dollars during the economically depressed 2000s, built or renovated most campus buildings, trebled its land acreage and increased its endowment by 50 percent.<br /> <br /> President Bultman reflects on the importance and impact of A Greater Hope in the story on pages six-seven. Photo highlights from across his years in office are featured on pages eight-nine. A more detailed biographical sketch and links to other articles recently published in News from Hope College in commemoration of his presidency are available online.

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