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Hope College April 2013 : Page 8

Alumni Profile Profile Faculty Agents of By Christina VanEyl-Godin ’82 Change graduate, left their marks on the college, and on the world. Hope has honored the lives of these early graduates by commissioning artist Paul Collins to create four oil paintings, a collection called Celebrating Early Faces of Inclusion , for permanent display along with biographical sketches of the four men in the rotunda of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication. The project was developed by Alfredo Gonzales, associate provost and dean for international and multicultural education, who was inspired not only by their stories but by the college’s long-standing commitment to inclusion and global engagement. “The ideals of diversity and inclusion, important concepts toward acquiring the best education and hardly understood in the last half of the 19th century, remain deeply rooted in the soul and mission of Hope College,” Gonzales said. “It is this remarkable legacy that we celebrate by recalling the stories, accomplishments, courage, and hopes of our early graduates. Their stories are an example of the grace of God, who brought them to Hope. From here they were sent out into the world to do great things.” The college unveiled the portraits and honored the four alumni with multiple events on Friday-Saturday, Feb. 1-2, including a seminar presentation at the Haworth Inn and Conference Center as part of the annual “Winter Happening” event held for the community and a reception at the Martha Miller Center. Members of the Dooley and Ottipoby families attended the activities, and a representative of the Japanese consulate in Detroit was among the featured speakers during the reception. In addition, a delegation from Komoro City in Japan, where Kimura was born, and Meiji Gakuin University visited the campus the following week in part to honor Kimura’s memory in conjunction with the recent installation of his portrait. From the perspective of history, the four men’s lives are reflected in their accomplishments. But Collins’s artwork, created from photographs of the men as students, hints at another truth: when they arrived at Hope, they were ordinary adolescents—young men with fears and questions and dreams, unaware of the role they would play in the college’s history. Although they were young, they had already faced their share of stress and sadness: political upheaval, racism, segregation. The portraits by Collins capture their youth while revealing a glimpse of their future greatness, a greatness that comes not from epic achievement, but from a life well lived. The four students changed the culture of the campus during their time at Hope. Upon graduation, they used their acquired education in the fields of ministry and teaching, touching hundreds of lives during their years of service to God and to the communities in which they lived. Oghimi and Kimura came to the United States without funds or a plan for their higher education. While in New York they met Hope’s first president, Philip Phelps, who invited them L ong before the words diversity and multi culturalism became catch phrases in higher education, Hope College began its foray into global education. In fact, the mission of Hope College, “to educate students for lives of leadership and service in a global society...” can be traced to the very foundation of the college. Japanese students Motoichiro Oghimi and Kumaji Kimura comprised one-third of Hope’s first graduating class in 1879. Almost 50 years later, James Collins Ottipoby ’25, Hope’s first Native American graduate, and James Carter Dooley, Jr. ’32, Hope’s first African-American Dr. James Bultman ’63 speaks during the reception on Saturday, Feb. 2, that celebrated the four portraits’ installation in their permanent home on the second floor of the rotunda of the martha miller Center for global Communication. 8 News News From From Hope Hope College College

Agents of Change

Christina VanEyl-Godin

<br /> Long before the words diversity and multi culturalism became catch phrases in higher education, Hope College began its foray into global education.<br /> <br /> In fact, the mission of Hope College, “to educate students for lives of leadership and service in a g lobal society...” can be traced to the very foundation of the college.<br /> <br /> Japanese students Motoichiro Oghimi and Kumaji Kimura comprised one-third of Hope’s first graduating class in 1879. Almost 50 years later, James Collins Ottipoby ’25, Hope’s first Native American graduate, and James Carter Dooley, Jr. ’32, Hope’s first African-American graduate, left their marks on the college, and on the world.<br /> <br /> Hope has honored the lives of these early graduates by commissioning artist Paul Collins to create four oil paintings, a collection called Celebrating Early Faces of Inclusion, for permanent display along with biographical sketches of the four men in the rotunda of the Martha Miller Center for Global Communication. The project was developed by Alfredo Gonzales, associate provost and dean for international and multicultural education, who was inspired not only by their stories but by the college’s longstanding commitment to inclusion and global engagement.<br /> <br /> “The ideals of diversity and inclusion, important concepts toward acquiring the best education and hardly understood in the last half of the 19th century, remain deeply rooted in the soul and mission of Hope College,” Gonzales said. “It is this remarkable legacy that we celebrate by recalling the stories, accomplishments, courage, and hopes of our early graduates. Their stories are an example of the grace of God, who brought them to Hope. From here they were sent out into the world to do great things.”<br /> <br /> The college unveiled the portraits and honored the four alumni with multiple events on Friday-Saturday, Feb. 1-2, including a seminar presentation at the Haworth Inn and Conference Center as part of the annual “Winter Happening” event held for the community and a reception at the Martha Miller Center. Members of the Dooley and Ottipoby families attended the activities, and a representative of the Japanese consulate in Detroit was among the featured speakers during the reception. In addition, a delegation from Komoro City in Japan, where Kimura was born, and Meiji Gakuin University visited the campus the following week in part to honor Kimura’s memory in conjunction with the recent installation of his portrait.<br /> <br /> From the perspective of history, the four men’s lives are reflected in their accomplishments. But Collins’s artwork, created from photographs of the men as students, hints at another truth: when they arrived at Hope, they were ordinary adolescents—young men with fears and questions and dreams, unaware of the role they would play in the college’s history.<br /> <br /> Although they were young, they had already faced their share of stress and sadness: political upheaval, racism, segregation. The portraits by Collins capture their youth while revealing a glimpse of their future greatness, a greatness that comes not from epic achievement, but from a life well lived.<br /> <br /> The four students changed the culture of the campus during their time at Hope. Upon graduation, they used their acquired education in the fields of ministry and teaching, touching hundreds of lives during their years of service to God and to the communities in which they lived.<br /> <br /> Oghimi and Kimura came to the United States without funds or a plan for their higher education. While in New York they met Hope’s first president, Philip Phelps, who invited them to study at the college. They lived with the Phelps family in Van Vleck Hall, and both became baptized Christians during their college years. After graduating from Hope both went on to New Brunswick Theological Seminary, graduated, and became ordained ministers in the Reformed Church, which commissioned them as missionaries to Japan.<br /> <br /> In Japan, Oghimi served as a pastor, teacher, and school administrator; he also authored the first Greek-Japanese lexicon. Kimura also served as a pastor, and was a cofounder of Meiji Women’s School in Tokyo.<br /> <br /> Ottipoby, a Comanche born in Lawton, Okla., attended Western Theological Seminary after completing his degree at Hope. He became a pastor in the Reformed Church in America, serving several Native American congregations, and during World War II was the first Native American chaplain to serve in the U.S. Army.<br /> <br /> Dooley was a teacher and assistant principal in public schools in Louisiana and Alabama, as well as an assistant pastor and missionary with the 8th District Baptist Association. He inherited his passion for education from his father, James Dooley Sr., who in 1911 had founded the Southern Normal Industrial Institute in Brewton, Ala., for African-American children—who had no other educational options.<br /> <br /> Hope reached out, noted faculty member John Yelding, at a time when much of society might not have. The students, in turn, led the way for generations to come as they helped the college live out its mission.<br /> <br /> “When Hope welcomed these students, Hope didn’t choose to do what was easy; they chose to do what was right,” said Professor Yelding, an associate professor of education who co-presented the Winter Happening seminar with Gonzales and Andy Nakajima, associate professor of Japanese. “These students were agents of change for the fulfillment of God’s work.”<br /> <br /> Currently, Hope’s international students come from 36 different nations. Nearly 300 African-American, Latino, Asian, and Native American students are following the footsteps of these early Hope College graduates.<br /> <br /> Looking back at the scope of their lives, it’s easy to forget that when they stepped off the train at the Holland depot, these four men were typical young adults, full of promise and potential, much like the students who come to campus each fall.<br /> <br /> “In their stories we see the hand of God in leading them to Hope College and then equipping them for service in ways that honor God and the mission of Hope College,” Gonzales said. “These four early graduates represent Hope College at its very best. Their contributions to society would not have been possible without the educational experience provided by Hope College.”<br /> <br /> “I hope that the contributions of our early graduates will inspire our students to imagine the ways in which they, too, can serve the world,” he said.<br /> <br /> “The ideals of diversity and inclusion, important concepts toward acquiring the best education and hardly understood in the last half of the 19th century, remain deeply rooted in the soul and mission of Hope College. It is this remarkable legacy that we celebrate by recalling the stories, accomplishments, courage, and hopes of our early graduates. Their stories are an example of the grace of God, who brought them to Hope. From here they were sent out into the world to do great things.”<br /> — Alfredo Gonzales, Associate Provost and Dean for International and Multicultural Education

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