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Hope College April 2013 : Page 15

Faculty Profile Dedication to the Best eachers truly can have a major impact. It’s what prompted Lynne Hendrix, retiring as a professor of accountancy after 29 years at the college, to go into higher education. “I had a few fantastic professors, but one in particular made a difference in my life,” she said. “Teachers really do make a difference in helping students achieve their goal.” She found that her best instructors had worked in accounting, so she first went into public accounting herself. She loved it, so much that she nearly stayed in the profession, but a timely (and persistent) invitation from Hope won her over. Professor Hendrix has made a priority of conveying her enthusiasm for the profession, teaching and living into the slogan “Accounting is Fun.” She’s also emphasized providing experience for students, directing an accounting internship program that’s placed them with firms across the country. Her career highlights include having worked with colleagues Sylvia Boyd and Herb Martin to expand accounting into a major. Her impact on the Hope community has extended well beyond her department. For the past 24 years, she’s been the college’s female faculty representative to the MIAA and NCAA. It’s been a big commitment, with administrative T S tudents for duties such as serving on committees, calculating team GPAs and nominating individuals for awards and assuring eligibility, but, in true liberal arts fashion, she’s valued what Hope athletics bring to students. “It’s another thing that I became passionate about,” she said. “I was never a college athlete, but I saw the benefit of athletics—teamwork, listening skills, leadership skills, the realization that there’s something bigger than you: the team.” “It’s an easy job at a Division III school and in particular at Hope because most of our coaches are also professors, and the professors and athletic directors are primarily concerned about students’ academic performance,” she said. “That being said, we take athletics very seriously.” She retires ready for other priorities—more involvement in church and community, more time visiting family, sailing on the Great Lakes and other travel—but she also has no regrets about making the change from accounting to Hope. “You have wonderful students, you have wonderful colleagues, and I learned to appreciate so much the Christian atmosphere of the college,” she said. “I look back now and think, ‘Why was it such a difficult decision?’” Across her years at Hope, lynne Hendrix has had an impact on hundreds of students campus-wide, not only in her own discipline of accounting but through her long-time service as faculty representative to the mIAA and NCAA. Editor’s Note: As a complement to this story, a biographical sketch of Lynne Hendrix is featured on Hope’s website. hope.edu/pr/nfhc Stadium Named For ray and Sue Smith H olland Municipal Stadium, home of Hope football since it opened in 1979 and recently purchased from the City of Holland, will have a new name when the Flying Dutchmen open their 2013 season. Hope is naming the stadium in honor of longtime former coach Ray Smith and his wife Sue. “Ray Smith has left a winning-with-integrity legacy in intercollegiate sport at Hope, in the MIAA, and nationally at the Division III level of the NCAA,” said President Dr. James E. Bultman ’63. “As a coach and athletic director he inspired an exemplary athletics program and he did it the right way – with humility, fair play and wholesome balance within the spiritual, academic and social aspects of college life. He transformed intercollegiate sport at Hope while continuing the finest traditions of the college in athletics.” Smith, a professor emeritus of kinesiology who retired in 2009, served as director of athletics for men from 1980 to 2009, and coached Hope football for a quarter of a century (1970-94). He is the winningest football coach in the history of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA), and his tenure remains the longest of any football coach in America’s oldest college athletic conference. “It is most appropriate that the stadium be named in honor of Ray and his wife Sue. No coach achieves success to this degree without an understanding and supportive spouse. Sue Smith has been this for Ray throughout his long illustrious career in sport,” added President Bultman. “Together they have made a difference at Hope and in the Holland community.” A formal recognition is planned for Saturday, Sept. 14, in conjunction with the traditional Community Day home football opening game. hope.edu/pr/nfhc June 2012 April 2013 recently purchased by Hope from the city, Holland municipal Stadium is being renamed for ray and Sue Smith in celebration of the couple’s positive, transformative impact on intercollegiate sport at Hope. ray Smith, a member of the college’s kinesiology faculty, coached Hope football from 1970 to 1994 and served as director of athletics for men from 1980 until retiring in 2009. 15 15

Dedication to the Best for Students

Lynne Hendrix

<br /> Teachers truly can have a major impact. It’s what prompted Lynne Hendrix, retiring as a professor of accountancy after 29 years at the college, to go into higher education.<br /> <br /> “I had a few fantastic professors, but one in particular made a difference in my life,” she said. “Teachers really do make a difference in helping students achieve their goal.”<br /> <br /> She found that her best instructors had worked in accounting, so she first went into public accounting herself. She loved it, so much that she nearly stayed in the profession, but a timely (and persistent) invitation from Hope won her over.<br /> <br /> b Martin to expand accounting into a major.<br /> <br /> Her impact on the Hope community has extended well beyond her department. For the past 24 years, she’s been the college’s female faculty representative to the MIAA and NCAA. It’s been a big commitment, with administrative duties such as serving on committees, calculating team GPAs and nominating individuals for awards and assuring eligibility, but, in true liberal arts fashion, she’s valued what Hope athletics bring to students.<br /> <br /> “It’s another thing that I became passionate about,” she said. “I was never a college athlete, but I saw the benefit of athletics—teamwork, listening skills, leadership skills, the realization that there’s something bigger than you: the team.”<br /> <br /> “It’s an easy job at a Division III school and in particular at Hope because most of our coaches are also professors, and the professors and athletic directors are primarily concerned about students’ academic performance,” she said. “That being said, we take athletics very seriously.”<br /> <br /> She retires ready for other priorities—more involvement in church and community, more time visiting family, sailing on the Great Lakes and other travel—but she also has no regrets about making the change from accounting to Hope.<br /> <br /> “You have wonderful students, you have wonderful colleagues, and I learned to appreciate so much the Christian atmosphere of the college,” she said. “I look back now and think, ‘Why was it such a difficult decision?’”<br /> <br /> Editor’s Note: As a complement to this story, a biographical sketch of Lynne Hendrix is featured on Hope’s website.<br /> hope.edu/pr/nfhc

Stadium Named For ray and Sue Smith

Ray & Sue Smith

<br /> Holland Municipal Stadium, home of Hope football since it opened in 1979 and recently purchased from the City of Holland, will have a new name when the Flying Dutchmen open their 2013 season.<br /> <br /> Hope is naming the stadium in honor of longtime former coach Ray Smith and his wife Sue.<br /> <br /> “Ray Smith has left a winning-with-integrity legacy in intercollegiate sport at Hope, in the MIAA, and nationally at the Division III level of the NCAA,” said President Dr. James E. Bultman ’63. “As a coach and athletic director he inspired an exemplary athletics program and he did it the right way – with humility, fair play and wholesome balance within the spiritual, academic and social aspects of college life. He transformed intercollegiate sport at Hope while continuing the finest traditions of the college in athletics.”<br /> <br /> Smith, a professor emeritus of kinesiology who retired in 2009, served as director of athletics for men from 1980 to 2009, and coached Hope football for a quarter of a century (1970-94). He is the winningest football coach in the history of the Michigan Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MIAA), and his tenure remains the longest of any football coach in America’s oldest college athletic conference.<br /> <br /> “It is most appropriate that the stadium be named in honor of Ray and his wife Sue. No coach achieves success to this degree without an understanding and supportive spouse. Sue Smith has been this for Ray throughout his long illustrious career in sport,” added President Bultman. “Together they have made a difference at Hope and in the Holland community.”<br /> <br /> A formal recognition is planned for Saturday, Sept. 14, in conjunction with the traditional Community Day home football opening game.<br /> hope.edu/pr/nfhc

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