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Hope College April 2013 : Page 10

Campus Profile HASP By Chris Lewis ’09 25 Years couldn’t Hope have a similar organization for its own senior professionals? Nearly a decade passed before Dr. Hollenbach decided to propose his idea to Dr. John Jacobson, who had recently been named Hope’s 10th president. Ironically, Dr. Jacobson was quite familiar with Eckerd College, having previously served as its vice president for academic affairs and the dean of the faculty. With a solid network already established, he traveled to Eckerd with Dr. Hollenbach to meet with members of the college’s senior professional organization. Three months later, on May 31, 1988, Dr. Hollenbach’s vision was fully realized, as 48 retired and semi-retired professionals were inducted into the Hope Academy of Senior Professionals (HASP). The idea has thrived in the years since. Today, as HASP celebrates its 25th anniversary, the organization has more than 600 members. “The vision that Dr. Hollenbach had clearly responded to a need in our community,” said Dr. Jacob E. Nyenhuis, provost emeritus and professor emeritus of Classics, and director of the A.C. Van Raalte Institute. A member of the Elderhostel Institute Network, an association of Lifelong Learning Institutes, HASP is an independent, peer-led organization and, since 1995, a branch of Hope College. From the beginning, HASP’s mission was clear: to broaden its members’ intellectual horizons, enhance their cultural and social lives, and serve Hope College and the Holland-Zeeland community. To achieve these goals, HASP offers its members an extensive curriculum, a wide range of volunteer opportunities, and cultural and social events they can attend throughout the United States. “The heart and purpose of HASP is continuous education,” said Dr. F. Phillip Van Eyl ’55, president of HASP and professor emeritus of psychology. “Learning experiences are made available as classes and discussion and book groups.” Classes are offered year-round, focusing on one of four subject areas: fine arts; humanities; science, medicine, and technology; or social studies. Some classes, like nonfiction book discussion groups and “Writing Memoirs,” occur every month, while most are only offered once. With topics like Civil War songs and stories, Plato’s Republic , and Christian Mysticism, members have quite a selection to choose from. Typically led by HASP members, Hope professors, or Holland-Zeeland residents, each class provides stimulus for focused inquiry, allowing members to learn new skills, share their viewpoints and life experiences, and develop friendships with one another during three separate terms – fall, spring, and summer. Service is another vital component of HASP, as members use their talents and life experiences to enrich Hope students’ lives and improve the Holland-Zeeland community. Since 1988, members have volunteered as discussants in many Hope courses, including Developmental Psychology and Family Communication. “Developmental Psychology requests many volunteers each semester,” said Dr. Elliot Tanis, professor emeritus of mathematics. “Students are amazed by the vibrancy and life experiences of HASP members. And HASP members Celebrates F or some, retirement provides an opportunity to spend more time with friends and loved ones. For others, the Golden Years offer freedom to travel and explore new places. But, as Dr. John Hollenach’s retirement neared in 1978, he had even more in mind. A lifelong learner, Dr. Hollenbach, professor emeritus of English, served Hope College in various capacities, from vice president for academic affairs to dean of faculty, for more than 30 years. As he prepared for the next chapter of his life, he wondered whether or not he would be able to maintain the same intellectual stimulation he had enjoyed at Hope. A few months prior to his retirement, Dr. Hollenbach received some brochures from Eckerd College, a private liberal arts institution in St. Petersburg, Fla., which described an organization dedicated to lifelong learning for senior professionals. As he read the brochures, he began to wonder: why HASP members contribute to the campus community in many ways. Above, Sandy Buller is among the volunteers who offered insights from their life journeys to students in Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown’s Developmental Psychology class. 10 News News From From Hope Hope College College

HASP Celebrates 25 Years

Chris Lewis

<br /> For some, retirement provides an opportunity to spend more time with friends and loved ones. For others, the Golden Years offer freedom to travel and explore new places. But, as Dr. John Hollenach’s retirement neared in 1978, he had even more in mind.<br /> <br /> A lifelong learner, Dr. Hollenbach, professor emeritus of English, served Hope College in various capacities, from vice president for academic affairs to dean of faculty, for more than 30 years. As he prepared for the next chapter of his life, he wondered whether or not he would be able to maintain the same intellectual stimulation he had enjoyed at Hope.<br /> <br /> A few months prior to his r etirement, Dr. Hollenbach received some brochures from Eckerd College, a private liberal arts institution in St. Petersburg, Fla., which described an organization dedicated to lifelong learning for senior professionals. As he read the brochures, he began to wonder: why couldn’t Hope have a similar organization for its own senior professionals?<br /> <br /> Nearly a decade passed before Dr. Hollenbach decided to propose his idea to Dr. John Jacobson, who had recently been named Hope’s 10th president. Ironically, Dr. Jacobson was quite familiar with Eckerd College, having previously served as its vice president for academic affairs and the dean of the faculty. With a solid network already established, he traveled to Eckerd with Dr. Hollenbach to meet with members of the college’s senior professional organization.<br /> <br /> Three months later, on May 31, 1988, Dr. Hollenbach’s vision was fully realized, as 48 retired and semi-retired professionals were inducted into the Hope Academy of Senior Professionals (HASP).<br /> <br /> The idea has thrived in the years since. Today, as HASP celebrates its 25th anniversary, the organization has more than 600 members.<br /> <br /> “The vision that Dr. Hollenbach had clearly responded to a need in our community,” said Dr. Jacob E. Nyenhuis, provost emeritus and professor emeritus of Classics, and director of the A.C. Van Raalte Institute.<br /> <br /> A member of the Elderhostel Institute Network, an association of Lifelong Learning Institutes, HASP is an independent, peer-led organization and, since 1995, a branch of Hope College.<br /> <br /> From the beginning, HASP’s mission was clear: to broaden its members’ intellectual horizons, enhance their cultural and social lives, and serve Hope College and the Holland-Zeeland community. To achieve these goals, HASP offers its members an extensive curriculum, a wide range of volunteer opportunities, and cultural and social events they can attend throughout the United States.<br /> <br /> “The heart and pur pose of HASP is continuous education,” said Dr. F. Phillip Van Eyl ’55, president of HASP and professor emeritus of psychology. “Learning experiences are made available as classes and discussion and book groups.”<br /> <br /> Classes are offered year-round, focusing on one of four subject areas: fine arts; humanities; science, medicine, and technology; or social studies. Some classes, like nonfiction book discussion groups and “Writing Memoirs,” occur every month, while most are only offered once. With topics like Civil War songs and stories, Plato’s Republic, and Christian Mysticism, members have quite a selection to choose from.<br /> <br /> Typically led by HASP members, Hope professors, or Holland-Zeeland residents, each class provides stimulus for focused inquiry, allowing members to learn new skills, share their viewpoints and life experiences, and develop friendships with one another during three separate terms – fall, spring, and summer.<br /> <br /> Service is another vital component of HASP, as members use their talents and life experiences to enrich Hope students’ lives and improve the Holland-Zeeland community.<br /> <br /> Since 1988, members have volunteered as discussant s in man y Hope cour ses, including Developmental P sychology and Family Communication.<br /> <br /> “Developmental Psychology requests many volunteers each semester,” said Dr. Elliot Tanis, professor emeritus of mathematics. “Students are amazed by the vibrancy and life experiences of HASP members. And HASP members appreciate their interaction with students.”<br /> <br /> Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown, associate professor of psychology, invites HASP members to visit her classes once a semester. During the visits, members share information about their education, careers, and faith journeys. They also talk about the ways in which the world has changed during their lifetimes.<br /> <br /> “HASP exemplifies the importance of lifelong learning in numerous ways across campus,” Dr. Trent-Brown said. “The members I’ve had the pleasure to interact with are fonts of wisdom who extend the intergenerational perspective on campus and model for the community what scholarly and professional development looks like across decades.”<br /> <br /> One such member, Terri Holden, a former nurse manager at Loyola University Medical Center, currently volunteers with Hope’s department of nursing, working in skills labs, participating on research teams, and offering her advice and knowledge to students through guest lectures and finance seminars.<br /> <br /> “I have enjoyed not only caring for patients in the past, but also enhancing the role of the professional nurse through teaching and mentoring,” Holden said. “I feel privileged to contribute what I have learned and experienced during my 35 years of nursing.”<br /> <br /> Other members mentor students, serve on class and society program panels, provide career advice, and act as judges for contests, including the Hope College Model United Nations. Since 2003, HASP has also awarded a scholarship to junior and senior year students that demonstrate potential for academic excellence, but have financial needs.<br /> <br /> To support the Holland-Zeeland community, HASP members also volunteer for organizations like t he Unit ed Way, Ot tagan Addict ions Recovery Inc., the American Red Cross, and the Children’s Advocacy Center. Some members also choose to volunteer in local public schools’ tutoring and reading programs, while others serve as museum docents and trolley guides.<br /> <br /> “Before I moved to Holland, I visited Tulip Time and really enjoyed it,” said Waino Aukee, who has volunteered as a trolley guide during the annual Tulip Time Festival for the last 15 years. “Now it’s a tradition. My family comes to visit, and we’re able to meet people from all over the country.”<br /> <br /> HASP’s cultural and social e vents are also well-attended. The organization tends to offer at least one event each month, providing members with opportunities to attend ballets, operas, and historical church tours, sightsee on Mississippi River cruises, travel to cities like Chicago and Milwaukee, or visit ot her countries. Every summer, HASP members also attend a dinner/theatre event, hosted by the Hope Summer Repertory Theatre, which includes a play and a Hope presidential reception.<br /> <br /> Last August, HASP also held its first “Take a Grandchild” trip at Muskegon’s USS Silversides Submarine Museum.<br /> <br /> “The Silversides was used during World War II. We went through the museum, made kites, and visited the Coast Guard station,” Dr. Tanis said. “I took my 10-year-old grandson and we had a great time.”<br /> <br /> As members attend cultural and social events, further their knowledge in class discussions, and serve others, they also develop friendships with one another and build their networks.<br /> <br /> “The fellowship with other retirees, whom I have known for years or just met, is a very appealing aspect of belonging to HASP,” Dr. Nyenhuis said.<br /> <br /> “It provides an opportunity to associate with folks other than church members and former colleagues, so it is a broadening experience,” Dr. Tanis said.<br /> <br /> Members also appreciate the opportunity to enhance their knowledge and apply their life skills while serving others.<br /> <br /> “I was attracted by the volunteer opportunities within the college and community,” Holden said. “I also like the idea of lifelong learning.”<br /> <br /> “Although retired, I enjoy staying in touch with life and continue to be a contributing member of society,” Dr. Van Eyl said.<br /> <br /> As HASP celebrates its 25th anniversary, Dr. Nyenhuis believes the organization will attract new members for years to come.<br /> <br /> “I hope HASP provides opportunities for intellectual engagement for the next quarter century – and beyond,” Dr. Nyenhuis said. “By having a large cohort of actively engaged retirees organized around a shared vision, HASP will continue to appeal to retired professionals, because they desire to maintain an intellectual and cultural life.”<br /> <br /> “HASP exemplifies the importance of lifelong learning in numerous ways across campus. The members I’ve had the pleasure to interact with are fonts of wisdom who extend the intergenerational perspective on campus and model for the community what scholarly and professional development looks like across decades.”<br /> — Dr. Sonja Trent-Brown, associate professor of psychology

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