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Hope College December 2012 : Page 21

Alumni News f ter 10 years at Hope, I thought I had a firm grasp of what the liberal arts are all about. However, upon entering the classroom from a different perspective, I realized I had more to learn. This semester I taught 17 students in one of Hope’s First-Year Seminar (FYS) courses. These courses are designed to help first-year students transition to college by exploring an intellectually important topic and educating them regarding the purpose of a liberal arts education. At the beginning of the course we discussed an article by Nan Keohane, a professor at Princeton and former president of Wellesley College and Duke University. Her case for “The Liberal Arts as Guideposts in the 21st scott Travis ’06 Century” was published in The Chronicle of Higher Education Director of Alumni and in January. While the liberal arts prove valuable for Parent Relations success in an increasingly complex world, they also face criticism as much of higher education becomes more specialized. Amidst this backdrop, Keohane offers five defenses for the liberal arts: • The liberal arts are “insurance against obsolescence” as many, if not all, fields are rapidly changing; • No matter the profession, the liberal arts “hone the mind, teaching focus, critical thinking, and the ability to express oneself clearly both in writing and speaking”; • This type of education “is the best education for citizenship in a democracy like ours”; • The liberal arts also prepare us for “both society and solitude” by “cultivating taste and the knowledge of the arts and literature and music”; • Through studying the liberal arts, you become part of a “community of scholars,” both past and present. These five defenses proved valuable for class discussion. But it was through advising my students that I came across another significant reason to value the liberal arts. For students who are less than a year out of high school and just beginning to explore the concept of vocation, the liberal arts provide a framework through which to explore interests. Watching them begin to view the general education curriculum not as classes to “get out of the way,” but rather as opportunities for discovery, not only has been a highlight of my semester, but is further evidence of the value of a Hope education. A to Hope’s Window History A traditional picnic is among the highlights of the 1965 International summer school hosted by Hope and attended here by students visiting from meiji gakuin University of Japan with president Calvin Vanderwerf ’37 (left background). Featuring field trips, points of interest and a variety of activities, the program was designed to help international students experience American life in the context of a college community. The spirit of the program continues through the present-day’s “explore michigan” (discussed on pages six and seven), which across the school year has been scheduling events throughout the state and region for the college’s international students, recognition that when it comes to study-abroad, classroom lessons are only one among many opportunities for learning. Alumni Association Board of Directors executive Committee Lisa Bos ’97, President, Washington, D.C. Thomas Kyros ’89, Vice President, Grand Rapids, Mich. Anita Van Engen ’98 Bateman, Secretary, San Antonio, Texas Board members Victoria Brunn ’84, Santa Monica, Calif. Andrea Converse ’12, Lowell, Mich. Holly Anderson ’90 DeYoung, Beaver Dam, Wis. Lori Visscher ’83 Droppers, Maitland, Fla. Brian Gibbs ’84, Bad Homburg, Germany Thomas Henderson ’70, Dayton, Ohio Todd Houtman ’90, Indianapolis, Ind. Sa’eed Husaini ’13, Jos, Nigeria Garry Kempker ’74, Kalamazoo, Mich. Michael McCarthy ’85, Weston, Mass. James McFarlin ’74, Decatur, Ill. Leslie Schoon ’93 Monday, Kirkland, Wash. Juan Carlos Muñoz ’00, Holland, Mich. Nancy Clair ’78 Otterstrom, Bethel, Conn. Samantha Rushton ’14, Warren, Mich. Elias Sanchez ’78, Hinsdale, Ill. David Stavenger ’65, Midland, Mich. Janice Day ’87 Suhajda, Rochester Hills, Mich. Arlene Arends ’64 Waldorf, Buena Vista, Colo. liaisons Scott Travis ’06, Director of Alumni and Parent Relations Beth Timmer ’00 Szczerowksi, Assistant Director of Alumni and Parent Relations learn more about the Alumni Association online Class Notes Table of Contents 22 23 Class Notes: 1940s -1960s Class Notes: 1960s -1970s 24 Class Notes: 1970s -1980s 25 Class Notes: 1980s -1990s 26 Class Notes: 2000s 27 2010s -marriages 28 Class Notes: New Arrivals, Advanced Degrees, Deaths hope.edu/alumni June 2012 December 2012 21 21

Window to Hope’s History

Scott Travis

<br /> After 10 years at Hope, I thought I had a firm grasp of what the liberal arts are all about. However, upon entering the classroom from a different perspective, I realized I had more to learn. This semester I taught 17 students in one of Hope’s First-Year Seminar (FYS) courses. These courses are designed to help first-year students transition to college by exploring an intellectually important topic and educating them regarding the purpose of a liberal arts education.<br /> <br /> At the beginning of the course we discussed an article by Nan Keohane, a professor at Princeton and former president of Wellesley College and Duke University. Her case for “The Liberal Arts as Guideposts in the 21st Century” was published in The Chronicle of Higher Education in January. While the liberal arts prove valuable for success in an increasingly complex world, they also face criticism as much of higher education becomes more specialized. Amidst this backdrop, Keohane offers five defenses for the liberal arts:<br /> <br /> • The liberal arts are “insurance against obsolescence” as many, if not all, fields are rapidly changing;<br /> • No matter the profession, the liberal arts “hone the mind, teaching focus, critical thinking, and the ability to express oneself clearly both in writing and speaking”;<br /> • This type of education “is the best education for citizenship in a democracy like ours”;<br /> • The liberal arts also prepare us for “both society and solitude” by “cultivating taste and the knowledge of the arts and literature and music”;<br /> • Through studying the liberal arts, you become part of a “community of scholars,” both past and present.<br /> <br /> These five defenses proved valuable for class discussion. But it was through advising my students that I came across another significant reason to value the liberal arts. For students who are less than a year out of high school and just beginning to explore the concept of vocation, the liberal arts provide a framework through which to explore interests. Watching them begin to view the general education curriculum not as classes to “get out of the way,” but rather as opportunities for discovery, not only has been a highlight of my semester, but is further evidence of the value of a Hope education.

Hope College Alumni Association

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