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Hope College December 2012 : Page 16

A Greater Hope Every gift By Greg Olgers ’87 Matters as well as parents and friends, helped build and continue to fund the college. The dynamic includes a call for today’s alumni to repay the generosity from which they benefited by doing the same for new generations of students. Gifts to the annual Hope Fund are a crucial way through which alumni make such a difference. The Hope Fund directly supports day-to-day operations at the college, literally benefitting every student. “It just helps to support all dimensions of a student education—the academic portion, the social portion and the spiritual portion,” said Tom Bylsma ’86, vice president and chief financial officer for the college. “The beauty of it is that it’s unrestricted and can be used for any needs of the college, and thus it helps keep our tuition lower, making Hope College more affordable for students.” “If we didn’t have the Hope Fund, we might not have the same programs or the same level of services for our students,” he said. Long-time supporters of the college, the Rev. Donald ’54 and Alice Klepper ’55 Jansma of Green Valley, Ariz., have been contributing to the Hope Fund for 30 years. A Reformed Church in America (RCA) pastor who is now retired, Don in the early 1980s served as minister of church relations at Iowa’s Central College, which like Hope is affiliated with the RCA. Asked at the time to support Central’s annual fund and knowing the difference the fund made, the couple could do no less for the alma mater they cherished. “Every month I think about the college when I write out a check,” Don said. “We both are graduates of Hope, and we appreciated it. Our life was very molded by Hope College.” Consider any aspect of the Hope experience, and the Hope Fund plays a role: academic support including undergraduate research opportunities and technology upgrades; I t’s been said before, but it bears repeating. No student pays the full cost of attending Hope. That’s easy to see in the case of those who receive need-based or merit-based financial aid, but it’s also true for those who pay tuition in full. In fact, tuition dollars cover only 76 percent of expenses related to each student’s Hope education. The difference is covered because others have given, to help build a future for those they don’t even know and likely will never meet. It’s always been that way. President James Bultman ’63 light-heartedly calls it a “generational thing,” noting that every student who has ever attended Hope has been able to do so because earlier generations, alumni The Hope Fund is so import-ant that it’s an integral part of the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign, reflecting that the ongoing annual support and one-of-a-kind campaign initiatives are working together to make an even stronger Hope College for students. The rev. Donald ’54 and Alice Klepper ’55 Jansma have supported the Hope Fund for more than 30 years as a way of giving back. “we both are graduates of Hope, and we appreciated it. Our life was very molded by Hope College,” rev. Jansma said. financial aid; student services such as health and counseling, and career services; student organizations and activities ranging from Nykerk, to intramural sports, to Chapel Choir and Symphonette tours, to spring break immersion trips; guest speakers and multicultural events; and campus beautification and maintenance, from lawn care to lighting. “Because of the Hope Fund, the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences supported a weekend field trip to southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky for our students in the Historical Geology course. The students in the Structural Geology course traveled to Tennessee to observe folds, faults and fractures formed during the rise of the Appalachian Mountains,” said Dr. Brian Bodenbender, associate professor of geology and environmental science and chairperson of the department. “These trips greatly enhanced hands-on learning.” 16 News News From From Hope Hope College College

Every gift Matters

Greg Olgers

<br /> The Hope Fund is so important that it’s an integral part of the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign, reflecting that the ongoing annual support and one-of-a- kind campaign initiatives are working together to make an even stronger Hope College for students.<br /> <br /> It’s been said before, but it bears repeating.<br /> <br /> No student pays the full cost of attending Hope.<br /> <br /> That’s easy to see in the case of those who receive need-based or merit-based financial aid, but it’s also true for those who pay tuition in full. In fact, tuition dollars cover only 76 percent of expenses related to each student’s Hope education.<br /> <br /> The difference is covered because others have given, to help build a future for those they don’t even know and likely will never meet. It’s always been that way.<br /> <br /> President James Bultman ’63 light-heartedly calls it a “generational thing,” noting that every student who has ever attended Hope has been able to do so because earlier generations, alumni as well as parents and friends, helped build and continue to fund the college. The dynamic includes a call for today’s alumni to repay the generosity from which they benefited by doing the same for new generations of students.<br /> <br /> Gifts to the annual Hope Fund are a crucial way through which alumni make such a difference. The Hope Fund directly supports day-to-day operations at the college, literally benefitting every student.<br /> <br /> “It just helps to support all dimensions of a student education—the academic portion, the social portion and the spiritual portion,” said Tom Bylsma ’86, vice president and chief financial officer for the college. “The beauty of it is that it’s unrestricted and can be used for any needs of the college, and thus it helps keep our tuition lower, making Hope College more affordable for students.”<br /> <br /> “If we didn’t have the Hope Fund, we might not have the same programs or the same level of services for our students,” he said.<br /> <br /> Long-time supporters of the college, the Rev. Donald ’54 and Alice Klepper ’55 Jansma of Green Valley, Ariz., have been contributing to the Hope Fund for 30 years. A Reformed Church in America (RCA) pastor who is now retired, Don in the early 1980s served as minister of church relations at Iowa’s Central College, which like Hope is affiliated with the RCA. Asked at the time to support Central’s annual fund and knowing the difference the fund made, the couple could do no less for the alma mater they cherished.<br /> <br /> “Every month I think about the college when I write out a check,” Don said. “We both are graduates of Hope, and we appreciated it. Our life was very molded by Hope College.”<br /> <br /> Consider any aspect of the Hope experience, and the Hope Fund plays a role: academic support including undergraduate research opportunities and technology upgrades; financial aid; student services such as health and counseling, and career services; student organizations and activities ranging from Nykerk, to intramural sports, to Chapel Choir and Symphonette tours, to spring break immersion trips; guest speakers and multicultural events; and campus beautification and maintenance, from lawn care to lighting.<br /> <br /> “Because of the Hope Fund, the Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences supported a weekend field trip to southern Indiana and Northern Kentucky for our students in the Historical Geology course. The students in the Structural Geology course traveled to Tennessee to observe folds, faults and fractures formed during the rise of the Appalachian Mountains,” said Dr. Brian Bodenbender, associate professor of geology and environmental science and chairperson of the department. “These trips greatly enhanced hands-on learning.”<br /> <br /> The Hope Fund is so important that it’s an integral part of the A Greater Hope comprehensive campaign, reflecting that the ongoing annual support and one-of-a-kind campaign initiatives are working together to make an even stronger Hope College for students. New buildings are providing outstanding instructional and learning space for decades to come; endowment support will provide scholarships and support college programs in perpetuity; the Hope Fund is making a comprehensive difference immediately and continuously even as the other initiatives move from dream to reality. The Hope Fund represents $20 million of the $175 million campaign total. The Hope Fund goal for the current, 2012-13 fiscal year is $2.8 million.<br /> <br /> The annual nature of the Hope Fund is both its utility and challenge. Every July 1, the total resets to $0, relying on the members of the Hope family to make gifts and rebuild it each year.<br /> <br /> Some 8,000 alumni, parents and friends contribute to the Hope Fund annually. The total reflects about 22 percent of the college’s alumni.<br /> <br /> It’s a quantity that the college is hoping to see increase. The envelope that accompanies this story has be en provided in the hope that those who appreciated their own experience, or parents or friends who wish to support the college, will help provide the same for today’s students.<br /> <br /> First-time givers or those whose financial situation limits their ability to give needn’t worry about the amount. Every gift makes a difference, and every gift is appreciated.<br /> <br /> In its own way, participation is just as significant as the financial support itself. Multiple grant-making agencies consider alumni giving in particular when making their own decisions about whether or not to provide support, and well-known college guides weigh it in their institutional evaluations. In the Best Colleges rankings by U.S. News and World Report, for example, the alumni giving rate reflects five percent of each institution’s score, with the publication considering it “an indirect measure of student satisfaction.” (The gifts themselves also matter in the U.S. News rankings, which weigh per-student spending at 10 percent.)<br /> <br /> Senior Meghan Lechner of Massillon, Ohio, has made an early start on appreciating the impact and history of the Hope Fund as a member of the Student-Alumni Leadership Council (SALC) the past two years. Comprised of about 20 students, SALC focuses on connecting students and alumni while helping students as they transition from being undergraduates to alumni, and provides leadership experience, networking opportunities and professional development training as the members serve as ambassadors at events like Homecoming and Family Weekend.<br /> <br /> She’s enjoyed the opportunity to connect with the graduates who have preceded her. “To see some of the great things that alumni have done is very inspiring,” Lechner said.<br /> <br /> SALC’s work also includes coordinating the drive for the annual Senior Class Gift, which supports the Hope Fund. Some of the effort includes sharing perspective on what the Hope Fund is in the most immediate sense--“why it’s important, this is how it impacted you, whether you realized it or not,” she noted—but Lechner also values what it represents: alumni across the decades helping Hope to be Hope, a place built, shaped and sustained not only by those on campus, but by a larger family as well.<br /> <br /> Alumni support, she noted, “really speaks to the unique nature of the Hope Fund and the integrity and commitment of our alumni—that they continue to support the college even after they’ve gone.”<br /> <br /> “The Hope Fund isn’t just about a monetary donation,” Lechner said. “The Hope Fund from my experience represents so much more. It’s a gift to preserve the traditions and help make Hope the amazing, unique place that it is.”

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