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Hope College October 2012 : Page 6

Campus Profile Innovative, Recognized By Chris Lewis ’09 E Excellence a 70 – the highest score possible – on the Michigan Department of Education Teacher Preparation Institution Performance Scores Report, which was released this summer. Hope and the University of Michigan were the only programs in the state to earn a perfect score. Since the report’s inception in 2005, Hope has received an “Exemplary” rating every year, tying for first in 2006-07. Prior to the establishment of the state’s report, Hope’s department of education was also recognized by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) in 2002 as one of only six colleges nationwide to earn a “Distinguished Achievement Award.” The award was developed to identify institutions that integrate ISTE standards into their teacher-education programs. “These standards represent the most innovative thinking by educators regarding what teachers need to know about and be able to do with technology for teaching, learning, and assessment,” said Susan Mooy ’64 Cherup, who is the Arnold and Esther Sonneveldt Professor of Education. “Technology has become an integral part of teaching and learning for both students and professors and consistently reflects changes in the technological landscape. For example, iPad apps are currently used in the department’s literacy classes to enrich reading and writing skills. In addition, the apps are used in courses like ‘The Exceptional Child’ to prepare students for future careers in special and general education.” She added, “Initially, faculty debated whether to provide a separate technology course or to include technology in all courses. The department decided that students would gain a working knowledge of technological applications if they were infused into all education courses rather than taught in one course.” The college’s department of education has itself earned top marks from the State of Michigan, tied for first from among all of the state’s teacher-education programs in a report released earlier this year. Above, students participate in the college’s Liverpool June Student-Focused, ver since Hope’s founding in 1866, teacher preparation has been one of the college’s primary focuses. In fact, Hope’s first catalog stressed the importance of preparing educators for long-term careers, by emphasizing what was then known as the “Normal Branch” of college education, stating, “One of the ends proposed by the Institution has been the training of teachers; and those who have fixed on teaching, as a permanent profession, will be allowed to take the normal course of elective studies.” Today, the college’s department of education recommends roughly 150 graduating seniors to the State of Michigan for teacher certification each year, and more than 3,100 alumni work in elementary and secondary education, teaching in public and private K-12 schools throughout the world, all graduates of a program that itself earns high marks from the state. Earlier this year, the department earned Student-teaching placements around the country as well as abroad provide a range of options and opportunities for learning. Senior Lindsey Lane is student-teaching this semester in Nairobi, Kenya. “Through this approach, we are prepared to accommodate different learners by taking into consideration visual, auditory, and kinesthetic styles,” said Lindsey Lane, a senior from Palatine, Ill., with a special-education double-major (learning disabled and emotionally impaired). Aside from its technological applications, the department is also well-regarded for its field placements, which begin with the program’s very first course, “Educational Psychology,” and continue throughout students’ collegiate careers, enabling students to work with children and fully understand the demands of teaching well before their final semester as student teachers begin. Field experiences are built into nearly every education course, as students receive 120-150 hours of direct experience, teaching a wide range of subjects in multiple grade levels. Allison Taber ’09, who now teaches first grade in Hudsonville, Mich., was able to experience the department’s full assortment of field placements first-hand. “I had placements in many schools and grades, including kindergarten, first, second, and sixth grade,” Taber said. “My placements progressed from observation to teaching small lessons, to receiving full responsibilities, including parent contact. They were an excellent opportunity to experience teaching in a classroom.” The opportunities also extend off-campus, including summer programs at South Dakota’s 6 News News From From Hope Hope College College

Innovative,Student-Focused,Recognized Excellence

Chris Lewis

<br /> Ever since Hope’s founding in 1866, teacher preparation has been one of the college’s primary focuses. In fact, Hope’s first catalog stressed the importance of preparing educators for long-term careers, by emphasizing what was then known as the “Normal Branch” of college education, stating, “One of the ends proposed by the Institution has been the training of teachers; and those who have fixed on teaching, as a permanent profession, will be allowed to take the normal course of elective studies.”<br /> <br /> Today, the college’s department of education recommends roughly 150 graduating seniors to the State of Michigan for teacher certification each year, and more than 3,100 alumni work in elementary and secondary education, teaching in public and private K-12 schools throughout the world, all graduates of a program that itself earns high marks from the state. Earlier this year, the department earned a 70 – the highest score possible – on the Michigan Department of Education Teacher Preparation Institution Performance Scores Report, which was released this summer. Hope and the University of Michigan were the only programs in the state to earn a perfect score. Since the report’s inception in 2005, Hope has received an “Exemplary” rating every year, tying for first in 2006-07.<br /> <br /> Prior to the establishment of the state’s report, Hope’s department of education was also recognized by the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) in 2002 as one of only six colleges nationwide to earn a “Distinguished Achievement Award.” The award was developed to identify institutions that integrate ISTE standards into their teacher-education programs.<br /> <br /> “These standards represent the most innovative thinking by educators regarding what teachers need to know about and be able to do with technology for teaching, learning, and assessment,” said Susan Mooy ’64 Cherup, who is the Arnold and Esther Sonneveldt Professor of Education. “Technology has become an integral part of teaching and learning for both students and professors and consistently reflects changes in the technological landscape. For example, iPad apps are currently used in the department’s literacy classes to enrich reading and writing skills. In addition, the apps are used in courses like ‘The Exceptional Child’ to prepare students for future careers in special and general education.”<br /> <br /> She added, “Initially, faculty debated whether to provide a separate technology course or to include technology in all courses. The department decided that students would gain a working knowledge of technological applications if they were infused into all education courses rather than taught in one course.”<br /> <br /> “Through this approach, we are prepared to accommodate different learners by taking into consideration visual, auditory, and kinesthetic styles,” said Lindsey Lane, a senior from Palatine, Ill., with a special-education double-major (learning disabled and emotionally impaired). Aside from its technological applications, the department is also well-regarded for its field placements, which begin with the program’s very first course, “Educational Psychology,” and continue throughout students’ collegiate careers, enabling students to work with children and fully understand the demands of teaching well before their final semester as student teachers begin.<br /> <br /> Field experiences are built into nearly every education course, as students receive 120-150 hours of direct experience, teaching a wide range of subjects in multiple grade levels. Allison Taber ’09, who now teaches first grade in Hudsonville, Mich., was able to experience the department’s full assortment of field placements first-hand.<br /> <br /> “I had placements in many schools and grades, including kindergarten, first, second, and sixth grade,” Taber said. “My placements progressed from observation to teaching small lessons, to receiving full responsibilities, including parent contact. They were an excellent opportunity to experience teaching in a classroom.”<br /> <br /> The opportunities also extend off-campus, including summer programs at South Dakota’s Rosebud Indian Reservation and in Liverpool, England.<br /> <br /> Allison Greene, a junior from Bloomfield Hills, Mich., with a comprehensive education K-8 and special education-learning disabled major, participated in the Rosebud and Liverpool programs this summer.<br /> <br /> “I learned a lot about patience and understanding of students with different backgrounds,” said Greene. “I was also able to teach my first lesson, so now I feel more confident in getting up in front of a classroom.”<br /> <br /> During their final semesters at Hope, most education students work as teacher candidates in West Michigan-based public, charter, and private schools. Some, however, decide to student teach outside of Michigan, through off-campus programs like the Chicago Semester and the Philadelphia Semester.<br /> <br /> “These programs provide a chance for students to hone their skills in a unique educational setting outside of western Michigan,” said Nancy Cook, professor of education and director of student teaching.<br /> <br /> Through a relationship with Interaction International, an organization that places student teachers in schools throughout the world, the department has also begun to offer opportunities for students to teach in nations like Thailand and India.<br /> <br /> Lane will be teaching at Rosslyn Academy, an international Christian school located near Nairobi, Kenya, this fall. “I will be observing initially and then teaching full-time, planning and implementing daily lessons, assessing students, and providing different learning opportunities for many different learners,” she said.<br /> <br /> “Students have a wide range of experiences to choose from,” said Dr. Laura Pardo, professor of education and chairperson of the department. “It not only helps them find their niche, but also helps them see that teaching isn’t prescriptive.”<br /> <br /> Last spring, Spencer Vanderheide, a senior and special education major from Grandville, Mich., had a field placement at Holland’s Woodside Elementary. This fall, he is student teaching in a ninth-grade special needs classroom at Hudsonville High School.<br /> <br /> “My day-to-day responsibilities will change each week. At first, I will work on building rapport with students,” said Vanderheide. “Eventually I will create entire units and take over as a full-time teacher.”<br /> <br /> The array of placements and student-teaching opportunities is matched by the breadth of degree options available to students. The department offers seven majors and four minors at the Elementary Certification level and 23 majors and 14 minors at the Secondary Certification level. The most recent additions include a program in Early Childhood Education, which focuses on the development of children from birth to age eight.<br /> <br /> “With the introduction of that program this fall semester, we will eventually be placing student teachers in preschool and infant programs in the near future as well,” Professor Cook said.<br /> <br /> Beyond their formal coursework, students may also choose to serve with local organizations that work with children, such as the Children’s After School Achievement (CASA) or the Boys & Girls Clubs of America.<br /> <br /> Other students participate in studentled chapters of two national professional organizations, the Council for Exceptional Children (CEC) and the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development (ASCD). The organizations provide workshops and set up panels, featuring guest speakers who live and teach throughout the United States.<br /> <br /> All of the experiences weave together to prepare students in six professional abilities – effective communication, professional collaboration, curriculum development, problem solving, decision making, and scholarly education – by the time they graduate, alumni of a program that has been readying teachers to shape young lives for more than 150 years.<br /> <br /> “Hope education students possess the skills and knowledge necessary to be effective and collaborative teachers,” Dr. Pardo said. “As I interact with teachers and principals around the country, they speak often about how well-prepared our teachers are, how easily they adapt to new contexts, and how passionate they are about teaching all children.”

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