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Hope College October 2012 : Page 16

Campus Scene History in in H Action Hope history students contributed to the community by developing research papers for use as background by the artists developing proposals for Holland’s “Scenes from South Shore” mural project. Pictured is one of the five murals completed this summer, a celebration of Holland’s ship-building heritage by artist Jessica Miller. ope history students played a behind-the-scenes role in a highly visible addition to a neighborhood on Holland’s southwest side. The students developed 20 research papers made available as background information for the artists who developed proposals for the ongoing “Scenes from South Shore” community mural project. Highlighting aspects of Holland’s history, the initiative produced five murals this summer with another five planned for each of the next two years. The murals adorn the outer walls of businesses in the South Shore Village neighborhood on Holland’s southwest side. The concept was initiated by the City of Holland as part of its neighborhood enhancement program and developed in conjunction with merchants and residents of South Shore Village. The selections were made by a neighborhood committee based on the proposals, and the murals completed in August. To support the variety of themes the organizers hoped to see the artists address across the duration of the effort, the students covered A celebration of Holland’s landmark buildings by artist Conrad Kaufman includes the college’s Martha Miller Center for Global Communication. local-history topics ranging from Chief Joseph Waukazoo, to area boat-building companies and the Great Lakes liners that used to anchor in Holland, to Holland’s H.J. Heinz Company factory. The reports, along with background from other sources, were posted on the project’s online “Call to Artists” page, providing details and inspiration for the artists. “Hope College made that one step easier for them, so that the artists had some information available to them,” said Lorma Williams ’76 Freestone, executive director of the Holland Area Arts Council, which helped out by hosting the web page and using other communication tools to get the word out about the project. “It was really helpful. It was a springboard for where the artists went with some of their submissions.” Dr. Marc Baer, professor of history and chairperson of the department, recruited the students, who were history majors and minors, in response to the organizers’ request for help. He noted that the project presented a solid opportunity to serve the community while also supporting the department’s emphasis on providing meaningful opportunities for students to develop and apply a variety of skills. “The department provides real-world skills through its courses, including thinking through a project assignment and coming up with a plan for carrying it out; conceptualizing research strategies; locating appropriate sources and analyzing them, and writing both to inform and persuade,” he said. “My sense from reading the students’ essays is that the project gave the students involved an excellent experience in that it encompassed all these skills,” Dr. Baer said. “In no case did I need to look over their shoulders, and in very few cases did I even have to do light editing. As most of us today are asked to produce professional and cogent writing with strict length limits and deadlines, I would recommend any of these students to a variety of employers.” In addition to reflecting student scholarship, the completed project even features Hope visually. Mural painter Conrad Kaufman included the college’s Martha Miller Center for Global Communication in his exploration of Holland’s legacy buildings, along with landmarks such as downtown’s Tower Clock building and the former Ottawa Beach Hotel. To support the variety of themes the organizers hoped to see the artists address across the duration of the effort, the students covered local-history topics ranging from Chief Joseph Waukazoo, to area boat-building companies and the Great Lakes liners that used to anchor in Holland, to Holland’s H.J. Heinz Company factory. The topics of the other murals (and their artists) are: The Wizard of Oz , by Joel Schoon-Tanis ’89; Holland’s four Medal of Honor recipients, by Derek Johnson and Adam Dahlstrom; Holland’s ship-building, by Jessica Miller; and Holland’s landmark attractions, by Mary Sundstrom and Maggie Bandstra. A photo showing Joel at work on his mural is in the “classnotes” section. 16 News News From From Hope Hope College College

History in Action

Hope history students played a behind-the-scenes role in a highly visible addition to a neighborhood on Holland’s southwest side.<br /> <br /> The students developed 20 research papers made available as background information for the artists who developed proposals for the ongoing “Scenes from South Shore” community mural project. Highlighting aspects of Holland’s history, the initiative produced five murals this summer with another five planned for each of the next two years. The murals adorn the outer walls of businesses in the South Shore Village neighborhood on Holland’s southwest side.<br /> <br /> The concept was initiated by the City of Holland as part of its neighborhood enhancement program and developed in conjunction with merchants and residents of South Shore Village. The selections were made by a neighborhood committee based on the proposals, and the murals completed in August.<br /> <br /> To support the variety of themes the organizers hoped to see the artists address across the duration of the effort, the students covered local-history topics ranging from Chief Joseph Waukazoo, to area boat-building companies and the Great Lakes liners that used to anchor in Holland, to Holland’s H.J. Heinz Company factory. The reports, along with background from other sources, were posted on the project’s online “Call to Artists” page, providing details and inspiration for the artists.<br /> <br /> “Hope College made that one step easier for them, so that the artists had some information available to them,” said Lorma Williams ’76 Freestone, executive director of the Holland Area Arts Council, which helped out by hosting the web page and using other communication tools to get the word out about the project. “It was really helpful. It was a springboard for where the artists went with some of their submissions.”<br /> <br /> Dr. Marc Baer, professor of history and chairperson of the department, recruited the students, who were history majors and minors, in response to the organizers’ request for help. He noted that the project presented a solid opportunity to serve the community while also supporting the department’s emphasis on providing meaningful opportunities for students to develop and apply a variety of skills.<br /> <br /> “The department provides real-world skills through its courses, including thinking through a project assignment and coming up with a plan for carrying it out; conceptualizing research strategies; locating appropriate sources and analyzing them, and writing both to inform and persuade,” he said.<br /> <br /> “My sense from reading the students’ essays is that the project gave the students involved an excellent experience in that it encompassed all these skills,” Dr. Baer said. “In no case did I need to look over their shoulders, and in very few cases did I even have to do light editing. As most of us today are asked to produce professional and cogent writing with strict length limits and deadlines, I would recommend any of these students to a variety of employers.”<br /> <br /> In addition to reflecting student scholarship, the completed project even features Hope visually. Mural painter Conrad Kaufman included the college’s Martha Miller Center for Global Communication in his exploration of Holland’s legacy buildings, along with landmarks such as downtown’s Tower Clock building and the former Ottawa Beach Hotel.<br /> <br /> The topics of the other murals (and their artists) are: The Wizard of Oz, by Joel Schoon- Tanis ’89; Holland’s four Medal of Honor recipients, by Derek Johnson and Adam Dahlstrom; Holland’s ship-building, by Jessica Miller; and Holland’s landmark attractions, by Mary Sundstrom and Maggie Bandstra. A photo showing Joel at work on his mural is in the “classnotes” section.

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